Master of Science in Agriculture - Halifax - Nova Scotia - Dalhousie University - I1822

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Master of Science in Agriculture
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Master of Science in Agriculture - Halifax - Nova Scotia

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Master of Science in Agriculture - Halifax - Nova Scotia Master of Science in Agriculture - Halifax - Nova Scotia
Objectives:
The M.Sc. program is designed to provide a foundation for studies at the doctoral level and for professional careers in research and development, teaching, industry and extension.
Award:
Master of Science in Agriculture
Course Description:
Required Regular Courses

AGRI 5700: Communication Skills & Graduate Seminar

Through practical assignment students will be able to test and develop their communication skills. Topics will include review, criticism and writing of journal papers, grant applications, posters, seminars, lectures and interviews. This course is required for students enrolled in the M.Sc. in Agriculture Program.

Fall or Winter semester: two lectures and one seminar per week

AGRI 9000: Graduate Thesis

Students register for this course when they are engaged in research work for credit towards the M.Sc. In Agriculture degree.

Recommended Regular Courses

Where an undergraduate student wishes to take one of these graduate courses, the following signatures are required for approval: the instructor(s), the relevant Department Head(s), and the Graduate Coordinator.

AGRI 5710: Module Course

Coordinator: Prof. Caldwell

This course normally consists of three modules. Each module consists of one month of lectures or assignments (2-3 hours per week) dealing with a topic in the lecturer's area of expertise. Research interests of incoming students are taken into account each year when module topics are solicited. Depending on the background of the student selecting the module, the work will be at an introductory graduate level. However, students should not apply to take a module unless they have at least a second year undergraduate background in related material. A formal evaluation is made at the end of each module. This course normally consists of three modules. All graduate students are required to complete this course, and are encouraged to do so in their first year of study.

Fall & Winter Semesters

AGRI 5720: Applied Statistics & Experimental Design for Agriculture

Instructor: Prof. Astatkie

Prerequisites: AGRI 5630, or equivalent.

This course is designed to provide: i) practical skills in statistical methods and experimental designs, ii) an appreciation of situations when more complex models and methods are required, and iii) the ability to communicate experimental problems and results clearly to colleagues and statistical consultants. Students will be expected to successfully complete practical exercises involving real experimental problems and data sets. Students will also be expected to acquire proficiency in at least one advanced statistical software package. This course is recommended for students enrolled in the M.Sc. In Agriculture Program.

Winter semester: three lectures per week.

Other Regular Courses

Where an undergraduate student wishes to take one of these graduate courses, the following signatures are required for approval: the instructor(s), the relevant Department Head(s), and the Graduate Coordinator.

AGRI 5270: Economic Entomology

Instructor: TBA

Insect pest management in agriculture with emphasis on a selection of non-chemical approaches to insect control, e.g. natural, mechanical, physical, cultural, biological, biochemical, and/or legal control. According to student(s) interest, a section on chemical control can be included. This course is consistently in accord with the theory and principles of integrated pest management (IPM) and consequently, the term assignments will incorporate the study of sampling techniques and monitoring methods of insect pests and related beneficial arthropods. Attendance to certain relevant seminars may be required and directed readings may be assigned. A case history of a major agricultural insect pest will be included to satisfy the course requirement. The material will be submitted in term paper format and also delivered in an oral presentation. The case history will include the life cycle, host plants, pest status, damage, losses, control measures, research needs and IPM programs pertinent to the particular species.

Winter semester - 2 lectures and 1 tutorial per week.

AGRI 5350: Animal Research Methods

Instructors: Animal Science Faculty

This course is designed for students who are, or expect to be, working in Animal Science, or who have an interest in the methodology and ethics of animal research. The course will include consideration of some of the common or promising laboratory and field methods associated with domestic animal research, ethics of animal research, the analysis and interpretation and reporting of results. Students will be expected to participate in exercises, to contribute to discussions, and to present reviews on various aspects.

Fall semester : To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5360: Protein Nutrition

Instructor: Prof. Anderson

A study of the sources, availability and metabolism of protein and amino acids for the domestic animal. Subjects addressed include discussion of sources of protein, factors affecting digestibility of protein, digestion and absorption of protein and nitrogen, urea recycling, individual amino acid metabolism, excretion of nitrogenous wastes in birds and mammals, and protein and amino acid requirements of animals.

Winter semester, (offered in alternate years; next offered in 2008-2009): To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5365: Vitamins in Animal Nutrition

Instructor: Prof. Anderson

Vitamins and vitamin-like compounds are discussed in relation to the normal function of the animal. Vitamin metabolic interrelationships, assessments of adequacy, treatments of deficiency and sources both natural and synthetic are addressed for all vitamins. Current literature relating to each vitamin as bioactive molecules is discussed.

Winter semester, (offered in alternate years; next offered in 2009-2010): To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5380: Quantitative Genetics

Instructor: Prof. Patterson

An introduction to quantitative genetics theory and to statistical techniques used in domestic animal improvement. Computing and statistical techniques will be demonstrated, will be presented and relevant literature will be surveyed. Reference will be made throughout to performance recording programs used in Canada and throughout the world.

Winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5390: Molecular Genetic Analysis of Populations

Instructor: Prof. Farid

This course is designed to give graduate students some understanding of the theoretical aspects of population and molecular genetics. Various DNA fingerprinting techniques, such as minisatellites, microsatellites, RAPD-PCR, FRLP-PCR and SSCP-PCR, and their applications in population genetic studies will be discussed. Students will acquire hands-on experience with some of these techniques. Analysis of molecular data to estimate intrapopulation populations (heterozygosity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium) and interpopulation parameters (test of heterogeneity of allele frequency distributions, genetic distances, phylogenetic analysis, bootstrapping, F-statistics) will be covered.

Fall or Winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5440: Organic Environmental Analysis

Instructor: Prof. Hoyle

This course has limited enrollment. The course will involve the study of the analytical chemical techniques used in the analysis of environmental samples obtained from the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Included in this study will be the sampling methods used for air, water, soil, food and wastes, and modelling of environmental contamination. In addition, government regulations, hazard assessment and public awareness of these issues will be discussed. In addition to successfully completing examinations graduate students will be required to:

    * write a major paper on an important topical issue.
    * present that paper as a seminar before Departmental faculty, staff & students.
    * write a research proposal prior to starting the laboratory project.

Fall semester (Offered in alternate years; Next offered in 2008-2009): To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5520: Plant Breeding Methods

Instructors: TBA

Genetic and statistical principles underlying modern plant breeding methods are introduced. Those principles will be reinforced through the use of computer models. Cultivar development techniques for self-and cross-pollinated species are examined in detail. Applications of tissue culture, genetic engineering, and marker-facilitated selection are discussed. This course is open to students who have had introductory courses in genetics, plant breeding, statistics, and molecular biology.

Fall semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5530: Nitrogen in Crop Production

Instructor: Profs. Li, Lynch and/or Burton

Students will study the transformations of N in air, soil, water, and plants and consider crop requirements for N. Topics include the chemistry of N, the N cycle, N transformations in soil, N metabolism in plants, N transport in plants, N-fixation, N losses in agricultural systems and an evaluation of N fertilizer in these systems.

Fall semester (Offered in alternative years, Next offered in 2008-2009): To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5560: Advanced Crop Physiology

Instructor: Prof. Caldwell

Physiological processes relevant to crop plant development and production of harvestable yield will be examined.

Fall or Winter semester - to be arranged with the instructor. Offered in alternate years; next offered in 2009-2010.

AGRI 5705: Module Course II

Coordinator: Prof. Caldwell
Prerequisite: AGRI 5710

This course normally consists of three modules. Each module consists of one month of lectures or assignments dealing with a topic in the lecturer's area of expertise. Research interests of incoming students are taken into account each year when module topics are solicited. Students should not apply to take a module unless they have at least a second-year undergraduate background in the focus area. A formal evaluation is made at the end of each module.

AGRI 5740: Advanced Studies in Food Chemistry

Instructor: Prof. Pitts
Prerequisite: One recognized undergraduate food science course or equivalent.

This course is designed to allow graduate students to explore in detail various aspects of the chemical nature of agri-food products. This may include but is not limited to a study of naturally occurring components (functional foods and nutraceuticals), nutiritional changes during value-added processing and product formulation. The exact focus of the course will depend on the expressed interest of students in the course.

Fall or Winter semester - 1 lecture and 1 discussion per week.

Special Topics Courses

Special Topics Courses may be taken by undergraduate students only under exceptional circumstances. The following signatures are required for approval: the instructor(s), the relevant Department Head(s), and the Graduate Coordinator.

AGRI 5210: Special Topics in Environmental Microbiology

Instructor: Prof. Stratton

This course will allow students to study a particular topic in the field of environmental microbiology in more depth than would be practical in a general course. The student will choose a topic in consultation with the instructor. An in-depth literature search will be required and the material gathered will be discussed in weekly tutorial sessions. Laboratory work will be conducted when required and if appropriate to the topic chosen. Topics for study can be of either a theoretical or applied nature, with the needs of the student being a primary factor in finalizing the topic.

Fall semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5220: Special Topics in Weed Science

Instructor: Prof. Sampson

Topics might include: evolution of weeds, impact of weeds on human history, weed ecology and physiology, crop/weed interactions, herbicide chemistry, physiological and biochemical behaviour of herbicides in plants, environmental fate of herbicides, myco-herbicides, biorationals. Two term projects and a research critique will be required.

Winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5240: Special Topics in Environmental Impact

Instructor: Prof. Stratton

This course will allow students to study a particular topic in the field of environmental impact or environmental toxicology in more depth than would be practical in a general course. The student will choose a topic for study in consultation with the instructor. An in-depth literature search will be required and the material gathered will be discussed in weekly tutorial sessions. Laboratory work will be conducted when required and if appropriate to the topic chosen. Topics for study should be related to the student's area of research or interests.

Winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5260: Special Topics in Plant Pathology

Instructors: Profs. Gray and Singh

This course will be custom-designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students specializing in the area of plant pathology who need further specific knowledge and/or skills.

Fall or winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5310: Special Topics in Applied Ethology

Instructor: Prof. Tennessen

Course content will vary. Topics covered will be chosen so as to meet the requirements of individual graduate students. Aspects could include the assessment of farm animal welfare, foraging behaviour, environmental enrichment, social dynamics of livestock, early rearing environment and the effect on later behaviour.

Fall or Winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5320: Special Topics in Animal Nutrition

Instructors: Profs. Anderson or Rouvinen-Watt

The course is designed to provide an opportunity to study specific aspects of animal nutrition. Aspects could include study of a particular nutrient, a process in nutrition, a nutritional state, or nutrient metabolism of a specific species with focus on the research method. The student is advised to consult with their supervisor to determine the specific scope of the topic to be studied.

Fall or winter semester : To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5340: Special Topics in Animal Physiology

Instructor: Profs. Duston, MacLaren or Rouvinen-Watt

This course is for students with a major interest in animal physiology. The course will consist of discussions, term papers and presentations. Students will be expected to nominate topics for consideration and to prepare major reviews and class presentations of selected topics.

Fall or Winter semester : To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5370: Special Topics in Animal Breeding and Genetics

Instructor: Dept. of Plant and Animal Sciences Faculty

Provides students with an opportunity to pursue more detailed studies in Animal Breeding/Genetics. Topics will be decided on by the student in consultation with faculty members for the purpose of meeting the student's specific needs as defined by the thesis research. Delivery will be a combination of directed reading and tutorial discussions.

Fall or winter semester : To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5410: Special Topics in Soil Fertility

Instructor: Prof. Percival

The course is designed to provide an opportunity to study specific aspects of soil fertility. Topics may include the influence of soil biological, chemical and physical properties and processes on nutrient absorption and plant growth, with emphasis on essential plant nutrients in the soil and methods for evaluation, as well as the use of inorganic and organic amendments.

Winter semester : To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5430: Special Topics in Environmental Analysis

Instructor: Prof. Hoyle

Students may apply to undertake either a specially designed course in environmental analysis, or to undertake additional work further to Organic Environmental Analysis. This may be facilitated with written consent from the instructor who then assumes personal responsibility for supervising the work.

Fall or winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5460: Special Topics in Soil and Water Management

Instructor: Profs. Havard, and Madani

This course will discuss state-of-the-art soil and water management practices in either humid or arid regions, depending on the specific needs of the graduate students. Topics may include: fundamentals of soil and water properties; drainage and water table control; management of farm irrigation and drainage systems; salinity control; irrigation water requirements; drainage requirements for humid and arid regions; soil conservation; and computer modelling of irrigation and drainage systems. Guest speakers will be invited to share their experience with students.

Fall or winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5470: Special Topics in Analytical Instrumentation for Researchers

Instructors: Profs. Pitts, Hoyle and Stratton

This course will be designed to meet the needs of graduate students who are using analytical instruments in their research. The course will provide the graduate student with specific theoretical knowledge and the necessary practical skills required to properly use the instruments of interest. The student will select either one of the following areas for a detailed consideration of 2 to 3 of the following areas for a more general coverage: gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, atomic analysis, DNA or protein electrophoresis, infrared or fluorometric analysis, NMR, and mass spectrophotometry, microscopy.

Fall or winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor

AGRI 5510: Special Topics in Plant Breeding

Instructors: Dept. of Plant and Animal Sciences Faculty

This course will be designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students specializing in the area of Plant Breeding who need further specific knowledge and/or skills.

Fall or winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5540: Special Topics in Crop Physiology

Instructors: Prof. Lada

ADVANCES IN PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Course description:

This course is an advanced course that is student driven. This course will address special topics of interest in Plant growth and development, at a whole plant level, encompassing Growth, flowering, fruit set, seed development, senescence, and environmental cues, growth regulators, signals that control the processes and interactions among environmental factors and endogenous factors that control plant growth and development. Students will choose their topics of interest, research and accrue recent developments. Students are expected to develop critical thinking of topics of interest under the umbrella of Plant Growth and Development, through research and write a review article using Annual Review of Plant Biology/ Trends in Plant Science. Students will also pick four articles of interest and prepare a slide show and present it to the class along with a summary of research relating to the articles. Students are required to conduct a mini project to test a original hypothesis taking into consideration of infrastructure available on any aspect relating to Plant growth and development. The results will be presented by the student at the end of the term along with a report using Plant physiology journal style.

Instruction Plan:

Course objectives:
• To enhance understanding of recent advances in plant growth and development through a participatory learning process using critical thinking approaches.

Activities: Activities include class discussion on various topics of student’s interest, student presentations, preparing a critical review on a topic of student interest, and a mini project

Format of instruction: This course will use critical thinking technique and participatory learning techniques

Winter semester.

AGRI 5570: Special Topics in Agricultural Biotechnology

Instructor: Prof. Benkel

This course will be designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students specializing in the area of Agricultural Biotechnology who need further specific knowledge and/or skills.

Fall or winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5610: Special Topics in Animal Product Technology

Instructor: Dept. of Plant and Animal Sciences Faculty

This course will review areas important in the technology of foods derived from animals (meat, fish, eggs, milk). Such areas could include chemistry (lipid oxidation, Maillard reactions), physics (changes caused by freezing, sol-gel conversion, colour) and microbiology (spoilage, pathogenic organisms, modified-atmosphere packaging, HACCP). Each student will be expected to present a review of a particular topic.

Fall semester : To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5760: Special Topics in Ecology

Instructor: Prof. Nams

This course will be designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students specializing in the area of ecology who need further specific knowledge and/or skills.

Fall or winter semester: To be arranged with the Instructor.

Cross-Listed Courses

AGRI 5250: Soil Microbiology (cross-referenced as MICRO 4000)

Instructor: Prof. Stratton

This course is designed to provide an intensive study of the microbiology of soils and will emphasize nutrient cycling and biodegradation. Topics covered include the relationships between the abiotic and biotic components of soils, the microbial biochemistry of the carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, phosphorus, and selected micronutrient cycles, heavy metal cycling, and the microbial degradation of industrial wastes and pesticides. The laboratory classes will concentrate on techniques to monitor the microbial biomass in soil and the microbial components of nutrient cycles. These include new advances in bacterial taxonomy and identification and the use of gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography in quantitating nutrient cycling. In addition to a major term paper, a comprehensive laboratory report on the entire term's lab work, and a single take-home examination, graduate students will be required to:

    * modify the term paper into a critical review of some aspect of soil microbiology (chosen in consultation with the instructor); the review must be current and in depth; it must be written in manuscript format and will be graded accordingly,
    * perform additional laboratory exercises not assigned to undergraduate students; use more replicates; perform a full statistical analysis of data; provide a report in manuscript format,
    * give a seminar to the class on their term paper topic.

Fall semester: To be arranged with the Instructor. Offered in alternative years.   Next offered in 2008-2009.

AGRI 5450: Environmental Soil Chemistry (cross-referenced as SOIL 4000)

Instructor: Prof. Hoyle

Minimum Enrolment: 10 or more students

The course is designed to provide an opportunity to study specific aspects of environmental soil chemistry. Topics may include the chemical composition of soils with special attention to soil biochemistry and soil organic matter with an emphasis on organic matter-clay interactions, soil organic N, P and S, and soil enzymology. Graduate students will be expected to participate in lecture/discussion sessions and complete required reading assignments. In addition, graduate students will be required to complete research papers and present their findings at in-class seminars.

Winter semester (Offered in alternate years; Next offered in 2009-2010): To be arranged with the Instructor.

AGRI 5620: Ruminant Digestive Physiology & Metabolism (cross-referenced as NUTR 4000)

Instructors: Prof. Fredeen

Prerequisites: NUTR 3000, CHEM 3006

This course is designed to provide an intensive study of food intake and digestion, and nutrient absorption and metabolism, in the ruminant animal. The course details current knowledge and focus on aspects of future research interest. Students are expected to contribute to discussions and present reviews to the class on various aspects of the subject.

Fall semester, Offered in alternate years; Next offered in 2008-2009.

3 lectures and 2 labs per week.

AGRI 5630: Intermediate Statistical Methods (cross-referenced as STAT 4000)

Instructor:  Prof. Astatkie

Prerequisites:  STAT 3000 or with permission of instructor

Analysis of single-factor experiments, randomized blocks, latin squares, factorial and two-level fractional factorial designs.

Fall semester - 3 lectures and 1 computer lab per week.

AGRI 5750: Biotechnology (cross-referenced as GENE 4003)

Instructor:  Prof. Wang-Pruski

Prerequisites:  Genetics (GENE2000) or equivalent

This course is to provide students with general information on the theory and technologies that are currently used in biotechnology. Course topics will include gene identification, transformation and expression regulations, tissue culture and cell culture techniques, and other genomics related agricultural applications. Nutriceutical and and pharmaceutical applications will also be discussed.

Winter semester, Offered in alternate years; Next offered in 2009-2010.
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