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Bachelor of Arts in Classical Civilization

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  • Objectives
    Classics programs have two related aims: first, to provide a solid background to the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome through written documents, including historical and literary sources, and archaeological evidence; and second, to train students to read and interpret texts in ancient Greek and Latin. The Classical Civilization programs aim at a broader study of the history, literature, and civilization of the ancient world. Texts are studied in English translation. Courses in Latin and/or Greek are optional except for a minimum requirement in the Honours program.
  • Academic Title
    Bachelor of Arts in Classical Civilization
  • Course description
    CLAS 211 Greek Literature (3 credits)
    An introduction to the literature of ancient Greece, this course focuses on Homer and the epic cycle, the Homeric hymns, Hesiod and lyric poetry, tragedy and comedy. The texts are read in English translation.

    CLAS 212 Roman Literature (3 credits)
    An introduction to the major authors of the Roman world, this course focuses on Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid and Lucretius; works of the dramatists, orators and satirists may also be included. The texts are read in English translation.

    CLAS 221 Life and Times in Ancient Greece (3 credits)
    This course explores the lifestyles, customs, and daily practices of the people of Ancient Greece through archaeological, historical, and literary sources.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CLAS 298 number may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 222 Life and Times in Ancient Rome (3 credits)
    This course explores the lifestyles, customs, and daily practices of the people of Ancient Rome through archaeological, historical, and literary sources.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CLAS 298 number may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 230 (also listed as HIST 219) Ancient Near East (3 credits)
    A political, social, economic, and intellectual history of the ancient Near East, this course surveys the period from the origins of civilization in the middle of the fourth millennium to Alexander the Great’s conquest of the Persian Empire in the latter part of the fourth century B.C.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 219 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 240 (also listed as HIST 223) Greek History from the Bronze Age to Alexander (3 credits)
    This course offers a political, social, economic, and cultural history of Greece from the Minoan-Mycenaean period in the second millennium to the end of Classical Greek civilization in the fourth century B.C., with special emphasis placed upon Athens.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 223 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 242 (also listed as HIST 225) History of the Roman Republic (3 credits)
    This course offers a political, social, economic, and cultural history of Rome from the city’s origins to the establishment of the Roman Empire under the Emperor Augustus.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 225 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 261 Greek Mythology (3 credits)
    A survey of the myths of ancient Greece and their characters — deities, heroes, mortals and monsters, this course examines the significance of the myths within their own time and their relevance for the modern world. Both literary and visual sources are used.

    CLAS 262 Mythology of the Ancient Mediterranean (3 credits)
    An examination of the common mythological themes of the ancient Mediterranean, this course focuses on the events, the characters, and the significance of recurrent elements as found in the myths of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome.

    CLAS 263 Archaeology of Ancient Greece (3 credits)
    This course explores the cultural developments of the period (circa 650 to 450 B.C.E.) through its material remains.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a CLAS 298 number may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 266 An Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3 credits)
    This course provides a general overview of the material remains of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. It addresses the function, context, dating, and meaning of artifacts, as well as methods of analysis.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAZ 266 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 267 The Archaeology of the Greek Bronze Age (3 credits)
    The Bronze Age in Mainland Greece, Crete, and the Greek Islands.

    CLAS 280 Introductory Ancient Greek (6 credits)
    The fundamentals of Greek grammar are presented in a course designed to enable the student to read the ancient authors as soon as possible.

    CLAS 290 Introductory Latin (6 credits)
    The fundamentals of Latin grammar are presented in a course designed to enable the student to read the principal Roman authors as soon as possible.

    CLAS 298 Selected Topics in Classics (3 credits)

    CLAS 299 Selected Topics in Classics (6 credits)

    Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, will be stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

    CLAS 320 The Heroic Epics of Greece and Rome (3 credits)
    Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid are considered in depth, with some attention given to other examples of epic, such as the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes and Lucan’s Pharsalia. Topics include epic as a genre, the nature of oral poetry, ethical values presented and the epic tradition and innovation. The texts are read in English translation.

    CLAS 330 Greek Drama (3 credits)
    Designed as an introduction to Greek drama from the origins of tragedy in the sixth century to New Comedy, this course consists of a detailed study of selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes and Menander. Also considered are Aristotle’s Poetics and production techniques of the Greek theatre. The texts are read in English translation.

    CLAS 341 (also listed as HIST 323) Greek History from Alexander to the Roman Conquest (3 credits)
    A political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from Alexander the Great to the Roman conquest of Greece in 146 B.C.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 241/HIST 224 or HIST 323 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 343 (also listed as HIST 327) History of the Roman Empire (3 credits)
    This course offers a political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman Empire from Augustus to the end of the Roman Empire in the West.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 243/HIST 226 or HIST 327 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 353 Representations of Women in Ancient Greece and Rome (3 credits)
    The ancient Greek and Roman representations of women are examined within their historical and cultural contexts. Focus is placed on the changing social roles, status and images of women in antiquity. Both visual and literary sources are used.

    CLAS 364 Classical Greek Art and Archaeology (3 credits)
    An exploration of the monuments and artifacts of Classical Greece, ca. 680 to 380 B.C., this course concentrates on architecture, sculpture, vase painting, artistic production and methods of interpretation.

    CLAS 365 Art and Archaeology of the Hellenistic Age (3 credits)
    An investigation of the art and archaeology of the Hellenistic age from the death of Alexander in 323 to the mid-first century B.C., this course examines architecture, sculpture, mosaics, wall painting and the minor arts; emphasis is on the Roman influence on Greek art of the period.

    CLAS 369 Roman Art and Archaeology (3 credits)
    An introduction to the artifacts and monuments of Roman civilization from the sixth century B.C. through the Empire (third century A.D.), this course examines artistic styles, techniques, function, iconography and interpretation.

    CLAS 370 Practicum in Archaeology (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. This course is designed to give the student on-site fieldwork experience in either survey or excavation work. At least one month in the field is required.

    CLAS 381 Reading Greek Prose (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 280 or equivalent. Prose works of authors such as Herodotus, Xenophon and Plato are read in the original Greek text. Attention is given to further study of grammatical and syntactical structures of the language.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 380 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 382 Reading Greek Poetry (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 280 or equivalent. Selected works of the ancient poets are read in the original Greek text, with emphasis on Homer and Euripides. Attention is given to further study of the grammatical and syntactical structures of the language.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 380 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 391 Reading Latin Prose (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 290 or equivalent. Prose works of authors such as Caesar, Cornelius Nepos, Cicero and Pliny are read in the original Latin text. Attention is given to further study of grammatical and syntactical structures of the language.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 390 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 392 Reading Latin Poetry (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 290 or equivalent. Selected works of the Roman poets are read in the original Latin text, with emphasis on Catullus, Ovid, Martial and Petronius. Attention is given to further study of grammatical and syntactical structures of the language.
    NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 390 may not take this course for credit.

    CLAS 398 Selected Topics in Classics (3 credits)

    CLAS 399 Selected Topics in Classics (6 credits)

    Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, will be stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

    CLAS 410 Advanced Greek Prose (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 381 and 382, or equivalent. Works of the Greek historians, philosophers and orators are studied in depth. While authors read vary from year to year, the primary focus is on Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato or Demosthenes.

    CLAS 411 Advanced Greek Poetry (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 381 and 382, or equivalent. Works of Greek epic, lyric or dramatic poetry are studied in depth. While authors read vary from year to year, the primary focus is on Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides or Pindar.

    CLAS 420 Advanced Latin Prose (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 391 and 392, or equivalent. Works of the Roman historians, philosophers and orators are studied in depth. While authors read vary from year to year, the primary focus is on Cicero, Sallust, Livy or Tacitus.

    CLAS 421 Advanced Latin Poetry (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: CLAS 391 and 392, or equivalent. Works of the Roman poets are studied in depth. While authors read vary from year to year, the primary focus is on Virgil, Ovid, Horace, Juvenal or Lucretius.

    CLAS 450 Honours Seminar (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. The seminars focus on oral presentations by students. Topics vary from year to year.

    CLAS 451 Honours Thesis (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. The student works with an individual faculty member in a particular area of archaeology, history or philology to produce an extensive research paper.

    CLAS 480 Tutorial (3 credits)
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. This course provides students with the opportunity to study a topic of individual interest under the guidance of a faculty member.

    CLAS 498 Advanced Topics in Classics (3 credits)

    CLAS 499 Advanced Topics in Classics (6 credits)

    Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, will be stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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