Home > Courses > Liberal Studies > Montreal > Liberal Arts Pre-University - Montreal - Québec

Liberal Arts Pre-University

Speak without obligation to Dawson College

To contact you must accept the privacy policy

Comments about Liberal Arts Pre-University - At the institution - Montreal - Québec

  • Objectives
    This broad survey of the history, intellectual and creative heritage of our civilization is designed to provide students with a strong foundation of knowledge and skills appropriate to university studies in most faculties outside architecture, engineering and the physical sciences. The program emphasizes a wide range of critical reading, leading to the effective expression of thought in writing and oral argument. Students will develop and demonstrate the capacity for * Critical thought and reflection * Personal responsibility and ethical discernment * Cogent, well-formed oral and written expression * Informed aesthetic responses
  • Academic Title
    Liberal Arts Pre-University
  • Course description
    Term 1
    Course Number     Course Name     C - L - H     Hrs
    300-121-DW    Research Methods: Research in Liberal Arts Disciplines    2 - 1 - 3    45

    Description:    This course introduces students to the use of research methods, especially those used by historians. It aims to instill a sense of how expository prose should be written, a familiarity with the uses of the modern library and a grasp of the requirements of scholarly integrity. Students use selected texts as guides in the preparation and writing of a model research paper on a topic assigned in one of the concurrent courses in the first term. The emphasis on research links this Methods course to the English, Philosophy and Classics courses given in the same term.
     
    332-115-DW    Greco-Roman Tradition    3 - 0 - 3    45

    Description:    The course aims to give the student an overview of the major periods and achievements of the Greco-Roman civilization, with special emphasis on the reading of literature in translation. The student is made aware of the originality of the Greco-Roman achievement and the debt owed to it by subsequent Western civilization. A criterion in the choice of texts for study is the influence they have exercised on the later Western tradition. For the purpose of this survey, Greco-Roman antiquity will be divided into six periods. From each period are drawn writings that are representative of the major forms of literature of the ancient world.
     
    340-910-DW    Ancient Philosophy    3 - 0 - 3    45
    Description:    In this course, the writings of the pre-Socratic philosophers will be studies, such as Thales, Anaximander, Empedocles, and some texts of Plato and Aristotle. The main objective is to introduce students to ancient philosophical ideas, including those of ancient science, with an eye to clarifying some of the projects and problems of philosophy, and to understanding the similarities and differences between ancient and modern science.
     
    370-121-DW    Sacred Writings    3 - 0 - 3    45

    Description:    Tanakh, the Bible and the Qur’an are the central documents and inspirations of the religious and ethical traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, respectively. This course introduces students to these sacred writings and aims to provide the foundation for an understanding of the many aspects of their importance. Students will become acquainted with these texts, their history, translation and scholarship, examining many of their historical, philosophical and moral themes and tracing some of their major influences in literature and culture.
     
    General Education
    • 109-103-02    Health and Physical Education    1 - 1 - 1    30
    • 345-102-03    World Views    3 - 0 - 3    45
    • 603-101-04    Introduction to College English    2 - 2 - 4    60

    Term 2
    Course Number     Course Name     C - L - H     Hrs

    ___-___-__    Option 100 Level Course          

        * 101-NYA-05: General Biology I
        * 201-103-DW: Calculus I
        * 201-105-DW: Linear Algebra
        * 201-NYA-05: Calculus I
        * 202-NYA-05: General Chemistry
        * 203-NYA-05: Mechanics
        * 350-101-DW: General Psychology
        * 381-101-DW: Introduction to Anthropology
        * 383-101-DW: Introduction to Economics
        * 385-101-DW: Introduction to Politics
        * 387-101-DW: Individual and Society
        * 401-101-DW: Introduction to Business
        * 502-132-DW: Newswriting
        * 511-112-DW: Visual Culture
        * 511-122-DW: Drawing and Creative Expression
        * 511-131-DW: Exploring Drawing
        * 520-121-DW: Photography: Themes and History
        * 530-111-DW: Images and Sounds
        * 530-112-DW: Understanding Media
        * 530-121-DW: Alternative Media
        * 530-122-DW: Documentary
        * 530-123-DW: Film Styles
        * 530-131-DW: Communication and Culture
        * 550-111-DW: Classical Music History
        * 550-131-DW: Intro to Guitar Techniques
        * 550-132-DW: Intro to Vocal Techniques
        * 560-131-DW: Theatre: Plays and Playwrights
        * 603-111-DW: Literature and Culture
        * 603-122-DW: Literature and the Arts
        * 603-131-DW: Biography, Autobiography and Blogs
        * 607-102-DW: Spanish I
        * 607-126-DW: Spanish for Hispanics
        * 608-102-DW: Italian I
        * 608-126-DW: Italian Mother Tongue I
        * 609-102-DW: German I
        * 611-102-DW: Hebrew I
        * 613-102-DW: Chinese I
        * 615-102-DW: Greek I

    330-270-DW    Post-Classical History    3 - 0 - 3    45

    Teacher(s) for Winter 2009:    Gesche Peters teaching section(s) 01 02
    Description:    This course introduces the student to the historical development of modern Western civilization from the disintegration of the European feudal and Christian order in the 14th century to the birth of the sovereign national state and a self-conscious universal culture in the late 18th century. The geographical scope includes Russia, the Middle East, Europe, the Mediterranean basin, and the continents and seas that saw European expansion. The purpose is to set students upon a historical journey through the complexity of persons and events, ideas and movements, and immense religious, social, intellectual and political changes of those centuries, and to examine the main lines of analytical interpretation of our past that attempt to give it shape and meaning. Topics given particular attention are the social, economic and religious upheavals of the 14th and 15th centuries, Renaissance humanism and its achievements, the Protestant Reformation and its consequences, the development of modern monarchies, the state and absolutist and constitutional politics, the ‘revolutions’ in science, agriculture and transoceanic commerce, and the colonization of the 16th and 17th centuries, the early industrial revolution, the thought and international politics of the Enlightenment, the origins, the ideas and course of the American and French Revolutions.
     
    340-912-DW    Modern Philosophy    3 - 0 - 3    45

    Description:    This course introduces students to modern philosophy. The most prominent philosophers of this period include Descartes, Spinoza and Liebnitz (the Rationalists), Locke, Berkeley and Hume (the Empiricists), as well as Immanuel Kant. This course includes readings from some of these philosophers and the study of some of the main issues of the period such as the distinction between body and mind, the question of the existence of God, and the nature of the external world.
     
    360-124-DW    Principles of Mathematics and Logic    3 - 2 - 3    75

    Teacher(s) for Winter 2009:    Kenneth Milkman teaching section(s) 01 02
    Description:    This course intends to introduce students to the nature of mathematical reasoning, and to certain theoretical considerations central to it, such as validity, proof, axiom, postulate, etc. Among the subjects included in this course are deductive systems, inductive logic, and axiomatic structures and their importance in much of ordinary mathematics (the decimal system, alternative number system, elementary arithmetic and algebra, Euclidian and non-Euclidian geometries, functions, calculus, etc.). The course also examines the distinction between “pure” and “applied” mathematics, and the reasons that mathematics seems to be virtually indispensable as the language of science.
     
    520-903-DW    Renaissance to Baroque Art    3 - 0 - 3    45

    Teacher(s) for Winter 2009:    Lois Valliant teaching section(s) 01 02
    Description:    This survey of European visual art from the early 14th to the late 18th centuries falls into three divisions: the emergence of painting as a major art form and the rediscovery of the art of classical antiquity in the 1300s and 1400s; the climax of this development in the High Renaissance art of the early 1500s; and the elaboration and transformation of High Renaissance art in the Mannerist art of the later 1500s and the Baroque and neo-Classical art of the 1600s and 1700s. The course builds on the first-term courses in the Bible and Greco-Roman civilization. The artistic upheavals of the Renaissance and Baroque eras are intimately connected with the religious, political, philosophical and scientific upheavals that accompanied them. The aim of this course is to show that, while art exists in its own right, its links to its social and intellectual context are important to an understanding of its meaning and achievement.
     
    General Education

    • 109-104-02    Physical Activity    0 - 2 - 1    30
    • 602-10_-03    French: Bloc A    2 - 1 - 3    45
    • 603-102-04    Literary Genres    2 - 2 - 3    60

    Term 3
    Course Number     Course Name     C - L - H     Hrs

    ___-___-__    Option 100 Level Course          

        * 101-NYA-05: General Biology I
        * 201-103-DW: Calculus I
        * 201-105-DW: Linear Algebra
        * 201-NYA-05: Calculus I
        * 202-NYA-05: General Chemistry
        * 203-NYA-05: Mechanics
        * 350-101-DW: General Psychology
        * 381-101-DW: Introduction to Anthropology
        * 383-101-DW: Introduction to Economics
        * 385-101-DW: Introduction to Politics
        * 387-101-DW: Individual and Society
        * 401-101-DW: Introduction to Business
        * 502-132-DW: Newswriting
        * 511-112-DW: Visual Culture
        * 511-122-DW: Drawing and Creative Expression
        * 511-131-DW: Exploring Drawing
        * 520-121-DW: Photography: Themes and History
        * 530-111-DW: Images and Sounds
        * 530-112-DW: Understanding Media
        * 530-121-DW: Alternative Media
        * 530-122-DW: Documentary
        * 530-123-DW: Film Styles
        * 530-131-DW: Communication and Culture
        * 550-111-DW: Classical Music History
        * 550-131-DW: Intro to Guitar Techniques
        * 550-132-DW: Intro to Vocal Techniques
        * 560-131-DW: Theatre: Plays and Playwrights
        * 603-111-DW: Literature and Culture
        * 603-122-DW: Literature and the Arts
        * 603-131-DW: Biography, Autobiography and Blogs
        * 607-102-DW: Spanish I
        * 607-126-DW: Spanish for Hispanics
        * 608-102-DW: Italian I
        * 608-126-DW: Italian Mother Tongue I
        * 609-102-DW: German I
        * 611-102-DW: Hebrew I
        * 613-102-DW: Chinese I
        * 615-102-DW: Greek I

    ___-___-__    Option 200 Level Course          

        * 201-203-DW: Calculus II
        * 201-NYB-05: Calculus II
        * 202-NYB-05: Chemistry of Solutions
        * 320-201-DW: Economic Geography
        * 320-212-DW: Tourism
        * 320-216-DW: Natural Environment
        * 330-201-DW: Canadian History
        * 330-206-DW: U.S. History
        * 330-210-DW: Quebec History
        * 330-214-DW: 20th Century History
        * 330-221-DW: Third World History
        * 330-225-DW: Social and Economic History
        * 332-201-DW: The Medieval World
        * 332-209-DW: Greek Civilization
        * 332-213-DW: Roman Culture and Society
        * 332-216-DW: Aegean Civilizations
        * 332-221-DW: Egyptian Legacy
        * 332-227-DW: Ancient World
        * 350-201-DW: Developmental Psychology
        * 350-211-DW: Abnormal Psychology
        * 350-214-DW: Psychology and the Law
        * 350-219-DW: Topics in Psychology
        * 370-201-DW: Religions of the East
        * 370-211-DW: Universe of the Bible
        * 370-213-DW: Encountering the Holy
        * 370-224-DW: Religion and Literature
        * 370-229-DW: The Holocaust
        * 381-201-DW: Human Evolution
        * 381-204-DW: Development of Civilization
        * 381-207-DW: Peoples of the World
        * 383-201-DW: Microeconomics
        * 383-206-DW: Economic Development
        * 383-210-DW: Money and Banking
        * 383-219-DW: Canadian Economic Policy
        * 383-224-DW: Quebec Economy
        * 385-201-DW: Comparing Countries
        * 385-208-DW: U.S. Politics and Government
        * 387-201-DW: Social Problems
        * 387-212-DW: The Family
        * 387-216-DW: Education
        * 387-219-DW: Sociology of Law
        * 401-201-DW: Basics of Marketing
        * 401-205-DW: International Business
        * 401-210-DW: Business Law
        * 502-231-DW: Feature Writing
        * 511-211-DW: Interactive Web Art and Culture
        * 511-222-DW: Painting, Colour and Composition
        * 511-232-DW: Photo Art and Creative Expression
        * 520-212-DW: 16th Century to Modern Art
        * 530-211-DW: Scriptwriting
        * 530-222-DW: Animated Film
        * 530-223-DW: Video Workshop
        * 530-224-DW: Film and Culture
        * 530-231-DW: Digital Culture
        * 550-231-DW: Music Appreciation
        * 550-232-DW: Guitar: Musical Expression
        * 550-233-DW: Voice: Musical Expression
        * 560-231-DW: Theatre: Concept and Craft
        * 603-221-DW: Literature into Film
        * 607-202-DW: Spanish II
        * 608-202-DW: Italian II
        * 608-226-DW: Italian Mother Tongue II
        * 609-202-DW: German II
        * 611-202-DW: Hebrew II
        * 613-202-DW: Chinese II
        * 615-202-DW: Greek II
     
    330-370-DW    Modern History-19th and 20th Centuries    3 - 0 - 3    45

    Description:    This course is a general survey of European and Western history from the French Revolution until the aftermath of World War II. Its main emphasis is on the understanding of first, the important broad socio-economic and political changes, and second, the relationship between these changes and the history of ideas. We examine the connection between the French Revolution and the ideas of such influential conservative thinkers as Edmund Burke and Joseph de Maistre. Similarly, the link between the Industrial Revolution and the various socialist ideologies is traced. The steady growth of liberalism and nationalism in the 19th century and of totalitarian and revolutionary ideologies in the 20th century are naturally important course themes.
     
    360-125-DW    Science: History and Methodology    3 - 2 - 3    75

    Description:    This course studies the conception of scientific knowledge through a close examination of the key ideas and findings of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton and Darwin, and their contemporary practitioners of science. Students examine the transition from a qualitative to a mathematical and quantitative conception of the universe. The development of the concepts of scientific law and scientific explanation, and the formulations of the scientific method, and of systematic experimentation as tools of the production of knowledge will be studied.
     
    General Education

    • 345-103-04    Knowledge    3 - 1 - 3    60
    • 602-B__-03    French: Bloc B    2 - 1 - 3    45
    • 603-103-04    Literary Themes    2 - 2 - 3    60

    Term 4
    Course Number     Course Name     C - L - H     Hrs

    ___-___-__    Option 200 Level Course          

        * 201-203-DW: Calculus II
        * 201-NYB-05: Calculus II
        * 202-NYB-05: Chemistry of Solutions
        * 320-201-DW: Economic Geography
        * 320-212-DW: Tourism
        * 320-216-DW: Natural Environment
        * 330-201-DW: Canadian History
        * 330-206-DW: U.S. History
        * 330-210-DW: Quebec History
        * 330-214-DW: 20th Century History
        * 330-221-DW: Third World History
        * 330-225-DW: Social and Economic History
        * 332-201-DW: The Medieval World
        * 332-209-DW: Greek Civilization
        * 332-213-DW: Roman Culture and Society
        * 332-216-DW: Aegean Civilizations
        * 332-221-DW: Egyptian Legacy
        * 332-227-DW: Ancient World
        * 350-201-DW: Developmental Psychology
        * 350-211-DW: Abnormal Psychology
        * 350-214-DW: Psychology and the Law
        * 350-219-DW: Topics in Psychology
        * 370-201-DW: Religions of the East
        * 370-211-DW: Universe of the Bible
        * 370-213-DW: Encountering the Holy
        * 370-224-DW: Religion and Literature
        * 370-229-DW: The Holocaust
        * 381-201-DW: Human Evolution
        * 381-204-DW: Development of Civilization
        * 381-207-DW: Peoples of the World
        * 383-201-DW: Microeconomics
        * 383-206-DW: Economic Development
        * 383-210-DW: Money and Banking
        * 383-219-DW: Canadian Economic Policy
        * 383-224-DW: Quebec Economy
        * 385-201-DW: Comparing Countries
        * 385-208-DW: U.S. Politics and Government
        * 387-201-DW: Social Problems
        * 387-212-DW: The Family
        * 387-216-DW: Education
        * 387-219-DW: Sociology of Law
        * 401-201-DW: Basics of Marketing
        * 401-205-DW: International Business
        * 401-210-DW: Business Law
        * 502-231-DW: Feature Writing
        * 511-211-DW: Interactive Web Art and Culture
        * 511-222-DW: Painting, Colour and Composition
        * 511-232-DW: Photo Art and Creative Expression
        * 520-212-DW: 16th Century to Modern Art
        * 530-211-DW: Scriptwriting
        * 530-222-DW: Animated Film
        * 530-223-DW: Video Workshop
        * 530-224-DW: Film and Culture
        * 530-231-DW: Digital Culture
        * 550-231-DW: Music Appreciation
        * 550-232-DW: Guitar: Musical Expression
        * 550-233-DW: Voice: Musical Expression
        * 560-231-DW: Theatre: Concept and Craft
        * 603-221-DW: Literature into Film
        * 607-202-DW: Spanish II
        * 608-202-DW: Italian II
        * 608-226-DW: Italian Mother Tongue II
        * 609-202-DW: German II
        * 611-202-DW: Hebrew II
        * 613-202-DW: Chinese II
        * 615-202-DW: Greek II

    ___-___-__    Option 300 Level Course          

        * 201-NYC-05: Linear Algebra
        * 320-302-DW: Applied Geography
        * 320-303-DW: Environmental Issues
        * 330-302-DW: Applied Canadian History
        * 330-306-DW: Applied U.S. History
        * 330-310-DW: Applied Quebec History
        * 330-314-DW: Applied 20th Century History
        * 330-321-DW: Applied Third World History
        * 330-325-DW: Applied Social and Economic History
        * 332-302-DW: Myths in Classical Society
        * 332-305-DW: Conflict in the Ancient World
        * 332-311-DW: Ancient World Archaeology
        * 332-314-DW: Ancient Trade and Commerce
        * 340-321-DW: Communication, Interpretation and Meaning
        * 350-302-DW: Interaction and Communication
        * 350-306-DW: Human Sexual Behaviour
        * 350-313-DW: Cognitive Development
        * 350-318-DW: Psychology in Business
        * 350-323-DW: Applications of Psychology
        * 360-300-DW: Quantitative Methods
        * 370-302-DW: Religious Cults and Sects
        * 370-306-DW: Life, Death and Beyond
        * 370-319-DW: Topics in Religion
        * 370-331-DW: Eastern Religions and the Arts
        * 381-302-DW: Race and Racism
        * 381-304-DW: Amerindians
        * 381-313-DW: Contemporary Anthropology
        * 381-318-DW: Archaeology
        * 383-302-DW: Macroeconomics
        * 383-307-DW: Current Economic Issues
        * 385-306-DW: Canadian Democracy
        * 385-311-DW: Global Politics
        * 387-302-DW: Culture and Media
        * 387-314-DW: Sexuality and Society
        * 387-319-DW: Race and Ethnic Relations
        * 401-305-DW: Global Management
        * 502-321-DW: Study of Language
        * 502-331-DW: E-Journalism
        * 511-311-DW: Sculpture and 3D Composition
        * 511-321-DW: Computer Art
        * 511-322-DW: Printmaking Techniques
        * 511-332-DW: Painting and Creative Expression
        * 520-311-DW: Art: Icons and Ideas
        * 520-331-DW: Canadian Art in Context
        * 530-311-DW: Communication Studies
        * 530-312-DW: Film and Social Issues
        * 530-323-DW: Communication Practices
        * 530-324-DW: Animation Production
        * 530-325-DW: Media Production
        * 550-312-DW: Jazz and Blues
        * 550-332-DW: Guitar: Musical Interpretation
        * 550-333-DW: Voice: Musical Interpretation
        * 560-331-DW: Theatre Practice
        * 602-331-DW: La francophonie
        * 603-311-DW: Literary Criticism
        * 603-321-DW: Creative Writing
        * 607-303-DW: Spanish III
        * 608-303-DW: Italian III
        * 609-303-DW: German III

    ___-___-__    Option 400 Level Course          

        * 201-401-DW: Statistics for Social Science
        * 320-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Geography
        * 330-401-DW: Advanced Studies in History
        * 332-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Classics
        * 340-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Philosophy
        * 340-421-DW: Philosophy of Art
        * 350-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Psychology
        * 370-411-DW: Advanced Studies in Religion
        * 381-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Anthropology
        * 383-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Economics
        * 385-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Politics
        * 387-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Sociology
        * 401-401-DW: Advanced Studies in Business
        * 502-421-DW: Culture and Media
        * 502-431-DW: Artists' Books and Graphic Novels
        * 511-412-DW: Drawing/Painting Studio
        * 511-413-DW: Sculpture Studio
        * 511-431-DW: Sculpture and Creative Expression
        * 520-421-DW: History of Contemporary Art
        * 530-412-DW: Multimedia Production
        * 530-421-DW: Cinema: Selected Topics
        * 530-422-DW: Film Theory and Criticism
        * 530-423-DW: Experimental Film and Video
        * 530-431-DW: Multimedia Creation
        * 550-431-DW: Guitar: Musical Performance
        * 550-432-DW: Voice: Musical Performance
        * 560-411-DW: Theatre of the Western World
        * 560-431-DW: Theatre Performance
        * 560-432-DW: Dance: Technique and Style
        * 603-411-DW: Creative Writing Workshop
        * 603-422-DW: Special Studies in Literature
        * 603-432-DW: Journalism Workshop/The Plant
        * 607-403-DW: Spanish IV
        * 608-403-DW: Italian IV
        * 609-403-DW: German IV

     
    360-199-DW    Integrative Seminar for Liberal Arts    2 - 2 - 2    60

    Teacher(s) for Winter 2009:    Daniel Sullivan teaching section(s) 01
    Beverly Sing teaching section(s) 01

    General Education

    • 109-105-02    Active Living    1 - 1 - 1    30
    • 345-BXH-03    Applied Themes in Humanities    3 - 0 - 3    45
    • 603-BXE-04    Applied Themes in English    2 - 2 - 2    60

Other programs related to Liberal Studies

This site uses cookies. If you continue navigating, the use of cookies is deemed to be accepted. See more  |   X