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Bachelor of Arts - Political Studies

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  • Objectives
    Political Studies provides students with a working knowledge of society and how decisions are made. Governments, politicians, leaders in private industry and ordinary individuals function within a framework of accepted political norms, e.g. notions of justice, freedom, rights and duties. Over time, these received norms are challenged by conventional methods such as voting, political parties, interest group lobbying and protest movements; or the challenge may be by militant or revolutionary means such as radical Marxism, fascist organizations or discrete acts of terrorism. Political Studies systematically examines and presents these phenomena.
  • Practical experience
    Students have the oportunity to participate in a variety of related internships arranged through the department. See Course Descriptions for more details.
  • Academic Title
    Bachelor of Arts - Political Studies
  • Course description
    Honours in Political Studies

    An Honours program in Political Studies consists of at least 60 credits.
    To enter or continue in an Honours program, students must normally obtain and sustain a cumulative average of 70% in their Political Studies courses. Honours students must maintain a satisfactory pattern of performance in all of their Political Studies courses, and should not receive grades below 70% in more than one quarter of their Political Studies credits. Honours students who do not fulfill all of the above requirements will automatically revert to the Major program. To be awarded Honours at graduation, students must be registered in the Honours program at Bishop’s during their last thirty (30) credits of study. Honours standing for graduation will be determined by the students overall record in the Honours program.

    Required Courses

    Students in the Honours program shall normally take Pol 100a and Pol 101b early in their studies at Bishop’s University. Students should normally take 100- level courses from the other divisions before attempting higher level courses. More advanced courses commonly have 100 - level prerequisites. After they have completed 60 credits at Bishop’s, students will need Departmental permission to take any further 100- level courses. In addition to the General Introductory Courses, students must take the following:

       2. Canadian Politics: any two (2) courses
       3. Political Theory: Pol 323a and Pol 329b
       4. Comparative Politics: any two (2) courses.
       5. International Relations: any two (2) courses
       6. Empirical Theory and Methods: Pol 261a and another course in division III Political Theory. Honours students are required to take Pol 261a in their first sixty (60) credits at Bishop’s University. Pol 262a, Pol 362b or Pol 460b may not be substituted for Pol 261a, but may be counted as a second course in division VI, in place of a division III course.

    Due to the close linkages between Politics and Economics, all honours students must also take:
    ECO 103        Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics
    400 and 500 Level Required Courses
    These courses are open primarily to Honours students. Honours students have three (3) options:

       1. They may take only Pol 550/Honours Thesis. This course is normally taken in the last thirty (30) credits in the Honours program.
       2. They may take one (1) 400 level course, from the list below, plus Pol 350a or Pol 351b. These courses are normally taken in the last thirty (30) credits in the Honours program.
       3. They may take two (2) 400 level courses, from the list below. These courses are normally taken in the last thirty (30) credits in the Honours program.

       2. Canadian Politics: Pol 410a
       3. Political Theory: Pol 420a or Pol 421b
       4. Comparative Politics: Pol 431b, Pol 436a or Pol 438a
       5. International Relations: Pol 441b
       6. Empirical Theory and Methods: Pol 460b

    Honours Thesis and Independent Study

    The Honours Thesis and Independent Study courses are open to advanced level Honours students. They are offered exceptionally and at the discretion of the Department. For further information, please obtain a copy of the departmental regulations and consult the Chair of the Department.

    Cognate Courses

    Honours students are normally expected to take at least 60 credits of Political Studies courses. However, students in their final thirty (30) credits of study, may petition the Department for authorization to take six (6) credits of cognate courses. This is to be done immediately following the formal registration period, but before the last day in the semester to add, drop or change all three (3) credit courses. It is understood that this is an exceptional measure to be granted at the discretion of the Department.

    Major in Political Studies

    A Major program in Political Studies consists of at least 48 credits.

    Required Courses

    Students in the Major program shall normally take Pol 100a and Pol 101b early in their studies at Bishop’s University. Students should normally take 100 - level courses from the other divisions before attempting higher level courses. More advanced courses commonly have 100-level prerequisites. After they have completed 60 credits at Bishop’s, students will need Departmental permission to take any further 100-level courses. In addition to the General Introductory Courses, students must take the following:

       2. Canadian Politics: any two (2) courses
       3. Political Theory: Pol 323a or Pol 329b
       4. Comparative Politics: any two (2) courses.
       5. International Relations: any two (2) courses
       6. Empirical Theory and Methods: Pol 262b or Pol 261a Majors should take one of these Division VI courses in their first sixty (60) credits at Bishop’s University.

    400 Level Courses
    These courses are open primarily to Honours students, but may be offered in exceptional circumstances to advanced level Major students, who maintain a 70% average, at the discretion of the Department.

    Independent Study

    Independent study is open primarily to Honours students, but may be offered to advanced level Major students, who maintain a 70% average in Political Studies. These courses are offered exceptionally and at the discretion the Department. For further information, consult the Chair of the Department.

    Cognate Courses

    Major students are normally expected to take at least 48 credits in Political Studies courses. Students in their final thirty (30) credits of study, who maintain a 70% average may seek Departmental authorization for a three (3) credit cognate. This is to be done immediately following the formal registration period, but before the last day in the semester to add, drop or change all three (3) credit courses. It is understood that this is an exceptional measure to be granted at the discretion of the Department.

    Minor in Political Studies


    A Minor in Political Studies consists of at least 24 credits.

    Required Courses

    Students in the Minor program shall normally take Pol 100a and Pol 101b early in their studies at Bishop’s University. Political Studies students have priority registration for Pol 100a and Pol 101b.
    Any one course in II. Canadian Politics, III. Political Theory, IV. Comparative Politics and V. International Relations.
    400 Level Courses
    Not normally open to students in the regular Minor program.
    Independent Study
    Not normally open to students in the regular Minor program.

    Cognates

    No cognate courses are allowed in the regular Minor program.

    Minor in Public Administration and Public Policy

    This program is designed to provide instruction in public policy decision making, public administration, policy evaluation, and the policy styles of various authorities. It develops analytical and management skills relevant to the public service at both federal and provincial levels, and includes training for students wishing to pursue positions as policy analysts and policy advocates in non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or who are considering advanced studies at the Master of Public Administration and Master of Business Administration levels.
    This minor consists of 24 credits: 12 credits of required courses and 12 credits of elective courses.
    (On course counting, consult the rules at the end of the section on the Minors).

    Required Courses (12 credits):

    One of the following three courses:
    Pol 101b           Introduction to Modern Governments
    Pol 112a           Canadian Political Process
    Pol 118b           Constitutional Law and Canadian Government
    In addition:
    Pol 214b           Public Administration
    Eco 103ab        Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics
    And one of the following courses:
    Pol 330a           Topics in U.S. Public Policy
    Pol 333a           The Internationalization of European Public Policy
    Pol 334b           Public Policy Analysis
    Any additional required course can count as one of the four elective courses below.
    Elective Courses (12 credits):
    Choose any four of the following:
    Pol 173b            US Government and Public Policy
    Pol 216b            Canadian Provincial Politics
    Pol 231a            European Union
    Pol 242a            International Organizations
    Pol 314b            Law, Politics and Canadian Society
    Pol 345b            Introduction to Public International Law
    Pol 410a            Selected Topics in Canadian Public Policy
    ECO 102ab        Principles of Economics: Microeconomics
    ECO 109ab        Introduction to Economic Policy
    ECO 204ab        Labour Economics
    ECO 205ab        Industrial Organization
    ECO 210ab        Economics and the Law
    ECO 308ab        Managerial Economics
    ESG 249a           Resource Management
    ESG 266b           Environmental Policy
    BAC 121ab        Purposes of Accounting
    BHR 221ab        Organizational Behaviour
    BHR 224ab        Human Resource Management
    BHR 312ab        Industrial Relations
    BHR 333b           Employment Law
    BMG 112ab        Management Theory and Practice
    BMG 221a           Business Law
    400 Level Courses
    Not normally open to students in this special Minor program.
    Independent Study
    Not normally open to student in this special Minor program.

    Cognates

    No cognate courses are allowed in this special Minor program.

    Minor in International Studies

    This program is designed to give students an understanding of international politics and global conflicts as well as prospects for peace. Students will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, go on an exchange program abroad and participate in a Model UN.
    This minor consists of 30 credits: 15 credits of required courses, 9 credits of elective courses, and 6 credits of language courses. (On course counting, consult the rules at the end of the Section on Minors.)

    Required Courses (15 credits):

    Pol 140b           International Relations
    Pol 345b           Introduction to Public International Law
    Pol 352f            United Nations Practicum
    Eco 103ab        Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics
    And one of:
    Pol 241b           International Affairs
    Pol 242a           International Organizations
    The second course can also be taken as an elective, replacing one of the courses on the list below.
    Elective Courses (9 credits):
    Choose any three of the following:
    Pol 234b        Politics of Africa
    Pol 236b        Introduction to Middle Eastern Politics
    Pol 245b        American Foreign Policy
    Pol 249b        Canadian Foreign Policy
    Pol 277b        European Diplomacy Since 1914
    Pol 317a        Globalization and the Canadian State
    Pol 333b        Internationalization of European Public Policies
    Pol 335b        Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean
    Pol 338a        International Law and Human Rights
    Pol 340a        Strategic Issues: Questions of War and Peace
    Pol 342b        International Political Economy
    Pol 343b        Canadian-American Relations
    Esg 358b       International Environmental Issues
    Language Courses (6 credits)
    6 credits at the intermediate level of one language other than the student’s mother tongue. These courses can be taken at Bishop’s or from a program at another university, approved by the Department of Political Studies and the Department of Modern Languages.

    Exchange Program

    Students taking the International Studies minor will normally be required to spend a semester at one of the many universities abroad with which Bishop’s has an exchange program. Such programs are developed in consultation with the Chair of the Political Studies Department. Note, however, that students must normally maintain a 70% average to be eligible for the exchange program. The Department will specify 6 credits of area studies to be taken abroad as part of the exchange program.

    In addition to the exchange program, students enrolled in the IS minor must take a 3 credit independent course Pol 352b UN Practicum (culminating in a Model United Nations Simulation in the Spring of each year). INT 300 may substitute for either POL 352 or the exchange program.
    400 Level Courses
    Not normally open to students in this special Minor program.
    Independent Study
    Not normally open to students in this special Minor program.

    Cognates

    No cognate courses are allowed in this Special Minor program.

    Counting of Courses in Special Minors

    Students registered simultaneously in Political Studies Honours, Major and regular Minor programs, as well as in the International Studies Minor, and in the Public Administration and Public Policy Minor, may normally count only a limited number of credits of these Special Minors, towards their Honours, Major and regular Minor programs (double counting):

       1. Only 18 Political Studies credits from the two Special Minors shall count towards the Honours program.
       2. Only 15 Political Studies credits from the two Special Minors shall count towards the Major program.
       3. Only 12 Political Studies credits from the two Special Minors shall count towards the regular Minor program.

    Students Outside of the Program
    Students not in the Political Studies Honours, Major and regular Minor programs shall normally take Pol 100a and Pol 101b early in their studies at Bishop’s University.
    Other Recommended Courses:

       2. Canadian Politics: Pol 112a or Pol 118b
       3. Political Theory: Pol 323a
       4. Comparative Politics: Pol 102b, Pol 170b, Pol 172a, Pol 173b, Pol 236
       5. International Relations: Pol 140b

    400 level courses, Independent Studies, and cognates are not normally open to students outside the program.

    COURSE OFFERINGS FOR ALL PROGRAMS IN POLITICAL STUDIES

    I. General Introductory Courses

    Political Studies 100a     Politics, Theory and Government     3-3-0
    A study of politics within the discipline of political studies and the application of scientific thinking and method to contemporary problems in society. Classical and modern theories will be used to examine such notions as equity and equality, participation and control, force and morality as they relate to authority in the nation-state and international affairs.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 101b     Introduction to Modern Governments     3-3-0
    A broad view of modern political institutions and processes. The differing forms and workings of governments - unitary, federal, presidential, parliamentary/cabinet, and how they get things done. The main features of representative democracies; comparative party, voting and electoral systems; referendums and recall procedures. Various countries will serve to illustrate the varieties and styles of governing.
    Staff

    II. Canadian Politics

    Political Studies 112a     The Canadian Political Process     3-3-0
    An analysis of the Canadian political process. This course will examine the social and economic environment of Canadian politics, political culture and socialization, political participation, voting behaviour, political parties and interest groups.
    Professor Johnson
    Formerly Pol 212a

    Political Studies 115a     Canadian Politics in the 21st Century     3-3-0
    An examination of external and internal problems challenging Canada and other post-industrial states as they approach the next century. Issues such as globalization, technological change, nationalism and the changing nature of the state itself will be examined.
    Normally offered in Continuing Education.
    Professor Johnson

    Political Studies 118b     Constitutional Law and Canadian Government     3-3-0
    An analysis of the impact of leading constitutional decisions on the structure of Canadian government.
    Professor Johnson
    Formerly Pol 218b

    Political Studies 211a     Canadian Social and Political Thought     3-3-0
    A study of community linkages as the basis of decision making: how the interaction and/or dominance or various elites produce social forces which shape and share power in Canadian society. Empirical studies and theories on elites, community power and corporatism will be used to examine aspects of Canadian political behaviour.
    Staff

    Political Studies 214a     Public Administration     3-3-0
    An introduction to the theory and practice of public administration in Canada. The structure of the public service, organization theory and motivation theory, public planning and finance, public personnel administration, the growth of administrative discretion and administrative responsibility will be studied.
    Prerequisite: One POL 100-level course or permission of instructor
    Professor Johnson

    Political Studies 216b     Canadian Provincial Politics     3-3-0
    A comparative analysis of contemporary trends in provincial policy making with special emphasis on Quebec. The structures and processes of provincial policy making will be examined. Provincial language policies, social policies, and resource policies will be studied.
    Professor Johnson

    Political Studies 314b     Law, Politics and Canadian Society     3-3-0
    This course examines the interaction of law and politics with societal and national values. Selected aspects of the Canadian legal system will include such topics as: criminal behaviour and sanctions, environmental protection, international law, labour relations and employment law, commercial law, consumer protection, immigration, family law, native rights, social welfare legislation and the accessibility of legal services.
    Staff

    Political Studies 317a     Globalization and the Canadian State     3-3-0
    In this course, the effects of the multilateral (World Trade Organization) and continental (North American Free Trade Agreement) trading systems on the Canadian state are analyzed. In particular, the effects of recent economic and technological forces on Canadian political processes and structures and on selected public policies will be examined.
    Prerequisite: Pol 112 or permission of instructor
    Professor Johnson

    Political Studies 410a     Selected Topics in Canadian Public Policy     3-3-0
    An analysis of selected topics in Canadian public policy from a comparative theoretical perspective. Lectures and seminars.
    Honours students only or permission of instructor.
    Professor Johnson

    III. Political Theory

    Political Studies 221a     Political Communication and Rhetoric     3-3-0
    The form and content of purposive political action to be found in information, instruction and persuasion through a study of models of communication and control. The course will examine the foundation and role of rhetoric in political speeches, debates and documents in relation to the concepts of political culture, the media and the available technology. Some of the sources to be consulted are: Aristotle, Cicero, Edmund Burke, Frederick Douglass, Emma Goldman, Winston Churchill, Jesse Jackson, and various contemporary political speeches.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 222b     Politics and The Arts     3-3-0
    A study of politics and its various modes of expression will be conducted from the inquiry of Aristotle’s Rhetoric and other literature. Concepts such as idealism, realism, ideology and violence are to be explored from a classical background of tragedy, modern essays and fiction. Some works to be used are from:Aristotle, Camus, Dostoevsky, Simone Weil, di Lampedusa, Nietzsche and others.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 223b/
    Classical Studies 223b     Democracy in the Ancient World     3-3-0
    The idea of government by the people is highly valued today, but it was first given the name of “demokratia” (democracy) in ancient Greece. The most famous example in Greece is Classical Athens, but democratic elements appeared in many other ancient states, including republican Rome. The course will examine in detail how democracy worked in Athens, Rome, and various other ancient societies: how it began, who could participate, who was left out, what ancient writers thought of it and what were the results of democratic government on those inside and outside of the community.

    Political Studies 322b     Theories of Totalitarianism and Racism     3-3-0
    An inquiry into the origins and causes of totalitarianism and racism. The course will evaluate the notion that the interrelation of ideology and technology in the 20th century leads to a unique form of repression in the history of politics. Authors will include George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, J.L. Talmon, Erich Fromm, Frantz Fanon and Malcolm X.
    Prerequisite: Pol 100a or permission of instructor.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 323a     Classical Political Philosophy I     3-3-0
    The history of political philosophy through a study of the classical theories from Plato to Machiavelli. The development and change of such concepts as justice, ethics, authority, the individual and the community are explored. A brief comparison with Eastern political philosophy is undertaken.
    Prerequisite: Pol 100a or permission of instructor.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 324b     Marxian Political Thought     3-3-0
    A study of the analytical fundamentals of Marx’s view of politics as derived from his critique of Hegel. The study of the development of Marx’s analysis of society, political economy and historical conjunctures.

    Political Studies 329b     Classical Political Philosophy II     3-3-0
    The psychosocial notions about man in a natural state and in society are explored in relation to individualism in Western market society. Analyses focus upon such concepts as the social contract, rationalism, revolution, conservatism, authority, political obligation and the growth of modern democratic theories. Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Bentham, J.S. Mill and Marx are the main theorists considered.
    Prerequisite: Pol 100a or permission of instructor.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 338b     International Law and Human Rights     3-3-0
    An analysis of the theory and practice of fundamental human rights in contemporary societies. A comparative study of the development and problems of civil liberties from a legal perspective.
    Prerequisites: POL 140 and POL 242 or permission of instructor.
    Staff

    Political Studies 420a     Modern Political Thought     3-3-0
    A study of various approaches and forms expressed in 20th century politics and society: symbolism, myth, scepticism, the psychological, anarchism and structuralism. Works will be from Freud, Oakeshott, Marcuse, Sartori, MacIntyre and Hayek. Honours students only or permission of instructor.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 421b     Advanced Political Thought     3-3-0
    The rise of liberal democracy and its critics. A textual study of Rawls’A Theory of Justice elucidates elite and critical theories, the notions of positive and negative liberty and concepts surrounding modern rights and duties within the political economy of the modern state and society. Other readings will be from: Max Weber, Hannah Arendt, Jacques Derrida and Ophulus’ Requiem. Honours students only or permission of instructor.
    Professor Tucker

    IV. Comparative Politics

    Political Studies 102b     Introduction to Contemporary Political Ideologies     3-3-0
    A study of classical and modern liberalism, conservatism and socialism, as well as other ideologies.An examination of the impact of ideologies on the actions of political parties and politicians, as well as on public policies.
    Professor Ugland

    Formerly Pol 202b
    Political Studies 170b     Introduction to European Politics     3-3-0
    A comparative analysis of European political history, economy, culture, and politics.
    Professor Ugland

    Formerly Pol 270b
    Political Studies 172a     Introduction to American Politics     3-3-0
    An introduction to political behaviour and processes in American society. Topics will include the socioeconomic bases of U.S. politics, the Constitution, political ideology and culture, parties, interest groups, elections and voting behaviour.
    Professor Stritch

    Formerly Pol 272a
    Political Studies 173b     U.S. Government and Public Policy     3-3-0
    An examination of U.S. political institutions and government outputs: the Presidency, Congress, the bureaucracy, federalism, the judicial system and public policy.
    Professor Stritch

    Formerly Pol 273b
    Political Studies 231b     European Union: History, Institutions and Policies     3-3-0
    A study of the foundation, operation, and policies of the European Union (EU). The first part of the course examines the history of the EU, the second part looks at its institutions, and the final part explores EU policy making processes and several different policy areas.
    Professor Ugland

    Political Studies 232     Politics in Asia     3-3-0
    This course will examine one or more Asian countries, such as China, India or Japan. It will focus on the character of domestic political institutions, processes, and culture in the context of a changing international environment.
    Staff
    Prerequisite: POL100 or permission of instructor

    Political Studies 234b     Politics of Africa     3-3-0
    Students are exposed to the approaches of political anthropology in the examination of ancient kingdoms, tribal societies, traditional cultures and the development of contemporary nations in Africa. Present political structures and processes are examined within the framework of Third World politics.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 235     American Political Economy     3-3-0
    This course studies the links between politics and economics in the United States and attempts to place this relationship in both its historical and international contexts. It examines how the principal forces in American society interact to shape public policy, as well as looking at the impact of government in managing and regulating economic activity.
    Prerequisite: POL 172 or permission of instructor
    Professor Stritch

    Political Studies 236b     Introduction to Middle Eastern Politics     3-3-0
    The course will focus on the forces that have shaped current Middle Eastern politics: particularly the growing influence of Islam and Islamic fundamentalism on political life and thought; the enduring legacies of westernization, colonialism and secular nationalism; and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Arriving at an understanding of Middle Eastern politics in this course will also entail study of the challenges modernizing states, parties and leaders are confronting today, and the profound impact of Western interests and policies on the region.
    Formerly POL131b
    Staff

    Political Studies 271a     American Political Thought     3-3-0
    An examination of early and contemporary American documents dealing with the philosophical notions of freedom, public access, government accountability and the regulation of society. The growth of a corporate democracy will be examined within the changing needs of private interests, public and transnational activities.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 330a     Topics in U.S. Public Policy     3-3-0
    A study of some of the most controversial issues in contemporary American politics. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, gun control, capital punishment, pornography, hate speech and censorship, drug legalization, affirmative action and welfare reform.
    Professor Stritch

    Political Studies 332a     The European State in Historical Perspective     3-3-0
    The purpose of the course is twofold: first, to determine why Europe developed into a relatively wealthy region; and, second, to determine why France embarked on the liberal- democratic route to modernity while Germany opted for the fascist route. Political Studies 333a Internationalization of European Public Policies 3-3-0 An advanced study of the European integration process from a political science / political economy point of view. The relationships between Europeanization, internationalization and gobalization of public policies in Europe will be examined.
    Prerequisite: POL 231 or permission of instructor
    Professor Ugland

    Political Studies 334b     Public Policy Analysis     3-3-0
    A critical analysis of the formation, content, and impact of public policy within selected postindustrial societies.
    Professor Johnson

    Political Studies 335b     Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean     3-3-0
    Latin American and Caribbean politics will be studied through general theories of development. Examined are such notions as growth, modernity, industrialization, underdevelopment, cultural history as they relate to national and international dependency and interdependency.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 339     Political Development and Market Sentiments     3-3-0
    A study of various theories of political development in new nations and the influence of global market sentiments.An exploration of works such as Adam Smith’s,A Theory of Moral Sentiments, Charles Lindblom’s, Politics and Markets as they apply to Huntington and Weiner’s Understanding Political Development and the “Clash of Civilizations” thesis. Countries and regions in Africa,Asia and Latin America will be selected for an examination of the relationship of globalization and development theories.
    Prerequisite POL100 or permission of instructor.
    Professor Tucker

    Political Studies 347a/b     Scandinavian Politics     3-3-0
    A study of political structures and processes in the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. While largely based on the comparative approach to the study of policies, the program will also highlight special features in each Nordic country. This course will also draw on comparisons between the Nordic countries and Canada.
    Professor Ugland

    Political Studies 431b     The American Welfare State     3-3-0
    A study of the origins, development and contemporary character of the social policy network in the United States. The structure of the welfare state, its current problems and attempts at reform will be examined in a theoretical and comparative context.
    Honours students only or permission of instructor.
    Prerequisite: Pol 172
    Professor Stritch

    Political Studies 436a     Comparative Politics: A World of Regions     3-3-0
    Regions and regional integration have become critical to contemporary world politics. This course offers a comparative analysis of regional integration efforts and their consequences in different parts of the world.
    Professor Ugland
    Honours students only or permission of instructor

    Political Studies 438a     Honours Seminar in Political Economy     3-3-0
    An analysis of selected classical and contemporary literature inquiring into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations.
    Professor Johnson
    Honours students only or permission of instructor

    V. International Relations

    Political Studies 140a     International Relations     3-3-0
    Examination of international political issues, institutions and processes. How do states behave toward each other in different types of international systems, and why do they behave in certain ways? Some discussion of international law.
    Professor Gagné

    Formerly Pol 240a
    Political Studies 241b     International Affairs: Conflict, Ethics, and the Prospects for Global Governance     3-3-0
    A study of global conflict and cooperation. The nation state system, international organizations and contemporary forms of transnational behaviour, such as political terrorism, are to be examined. The major themes of the course will include North South justice issues, current attempts to obtain a new international equilibrium, and the prospects for global governance/democracy.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140, or permission of instructor
    Professor Gagné

    Political Studies 242a     International Organizations: Principles, Institutions and Politics     3-3-0
    A study of the origins, structures and processes of institutions designed to resolve world conflict and secure international cooperation. The United Nations and Regional Organizations will be examined.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140a, or the permission of instructor
    Professor Gagné

    Political Studies 245b     American Foreign Policy     3-3-0
    The development of American foreign relations and national security policy in the twentieth century. Topics include: interventionism and isolationism, the Cold War and the nuclear arms race, the Cuban missile crisis,Vietnam, détente, US secret intelligence, US-Soviet relations in the Reagan era, the Gulf War, and US foreign policy in the post- Soviet world order.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140, or permission of instructor
    Professor Gagné

    Political Studies 249b     Canadian Foreign Policy     3-3-0
    An analysis of the development of Canadian foreign policy and defence policy. Canada’s relations with the Superpowers, the European Union and the Third World will be studied. Topics will include Canada’s role in the U.N. and N.A.T.O., Canada’s antinuclear diplomacy, and Canada’s domestic interests in relation to energy, the Law of the Sea and aerospace law.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140, or permission of instructor
    Professor Gagné

    Political Studies 277     European Diplomacy Since 1914     3-3-0
    This course examines the international relations and foreign policies of the major European states from the beginning of World War I to the Cold war and the emergence of the New Europe.
    Antirequisite: HIS 366
    Professor Gagné

    Political Studies 340a     Strategic Issues: Questions of War and Peace     3-3-0
    A study of the general character of war and conflict in the modern world since World War II. Discussions of the basic trends which influence conflicts, be they superpower rivalry or peculiar local conditions. Inquiry into the exploitation or the containment of conflicts by the major powers. Analysis of the most important crises and actual conflicts in such geopolitical areas as the Middle East, Central America, Africa or Asia. Discussion of the changing patterns of warfare, conventional and nuclear strategies, détente and changes in the maintenance of peace in the future.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140a, or permission of instructor
    Staff

    Political Studies 342b     International Political Economy     3-3-0
    A study of the political relationships to economic activities in the international arena. The theories, actors and structures in the world political economy will be examined.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140a, or permission of instructor
    Professor Johnson

    Political Studies 343b     Canadian-American Relations     3-3-0
    This course seeks to describe the main aspects of the relations between Canada and the United States. For that purpose, we will concentrate on the main determinants of the bilateral relationship, analyzed around five major themes: the political relations, the economic and trade relations, the identity/cultural relations, the defence and security relations, and the environmental relations.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140a, or permission of instructor
    Professor Gagné

    Political Studies 345b     Introduction to Public International Law     3-3-0
    An introduction to the nature and development of international law which includes topics such as the law of treaties, the law of the sea, air and space law, and international environmental law as well as jurisprudence related to international dispute settlement.
    Prerequisite: Pol 140 and POL 242 or permission of instructor
    Staff

    Political Studies 346     Politics of Global Finance     3-3-0
    A thematic exploration of the issues and politics of the global financial system. This course explores areas of money and global capital movements, financial instruments and bodies. It examines the functioning and ramifications of international finance, including the politics of international debt, global monetary relations and the transnational governance initiatives of global financial markets and actors.

    Political Studies 441b     Theories of International Relations     3-3-0
    A study of the various theories used in the investigation of international political behaviour: systems, models, empirical research will be examined towards a more precise understanding of evolving structures and processes in the international arena.
    Honours students only or permission of instructor
    Prerequisite: Pol 140, or permission of instructor
    Professor Gagné

    VI. Empirical Theory and Methods

    Political Studies 261a     Techniques of Empirical Research     3-3-0
    An introduction to empirical political research: the formulation of research problems, the selection of samples, interviewing, questionnaire construction, analysis and interpretation of data.
    Professor Stritch

    Political Studies 262a     Introduction to Political Analysis     3-3-0
    An introduction to key concepts in the study of politics in general and comparative politics in particular. An overview of the main assumptions, questions, concepts and patterns of inference of the principal approaches in political science.
    Professor Stritch

    Political Studies 362b     Comparative Political Behaviour     3-3-0
    The study of selected issues in comparative politics using quantitative techniques of data analysis. Topics may include such things as political participation, social movements, ideology and political culture, the welfare state, national identity, political parties and voting behaviour.
    Prerequisite: Pol 261a, or permission of instructor.
    Professor Stritch

    Political Studies 460a     Topics in Empirical Research     3-0-0
    An application of analytical techniques to specific problems in political research. Attention will focus on a detailed examination of selected issues at an advanced level.
    Honours students only or permission of instructor
    Professor Stritch

    VII: Honours Thesis, Independent Studies, Practicum and Internships

    Political Studies 350a     Independent Study     3-3-0
    Individual research and reading under the guidance of an advisor and the Department, of special themes in political studies.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department and instructor
    Staff

    Political Studies 351b     Independent Study     3-3-0
    Individual research and reading under the guidance of an advisor and the Department, of special themes in political studies.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department and instructor
    Staff

    Political Studies 352b     United Nations Practicum     3-3-0
    The study of the processes and structures of the United Nations System through seminars and labs, culminating in an annual Model United Nations simulated conference. Students will study the UN’s specialized agencies and related organs, and affiliated intergovernmental organizations. Students will prepare various position papers on a selected country, and develop resolution drafting and negotiating skills in preparation for the simulated conference.
    Prerequisites: Pol 140a and one of Pol 241b or Pol242a and the permission of the instructor.
    Staff

    Political Studies 550     Honours Thesis     6-3-0
    Individual research and reading under the guidance of an advisor and the Department, on advanced themes in Political Studies.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department and instructor.
    Staff

    INT 300     International Development Assistance Internship     
    Students must secure the approval of a Department and a faculty member in that Department to supervise an AUCC/Canada Corps Internship, a Champlain Regional College-Bishop’s University Mae-Sot Internship, a Champlain Regional College Peru Internship or any other internship, sponsored by an NGO or accredited institution recognized by a Selection Committee, chaired by the Vice-Principal. Application for selection and funding must be addressed to the Vice-Principal’s Office normally by December
    1. The number of internships is subject to acceptance by sponsoring agencies and availability of funding.

    INT 301     The Nicholas Bachand Canadian Civil Society Internship     
    The Nicholas Bachand Canadian Civil Society Internship is intended to provide a practical work-experience related to the Political Studies Minor in Public Policy and Public Administration. The internship is intended to enable students to contribute to the well-being of Canadian society by participating in voluntary and non-profit non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

Other programs related to Political Science

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