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Bachelor of Art - Sociology with Social Sustainability Concentration

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  • Objectives
    The Department of Sociology provides students with theoretical and methodological tools and substantive insights which can assist them in understanding social life, social organization, and action. The program is designed to provide students with a broad intellectual and sociological background which will help prepare them for a variety of careers and for advanced study at graduate school.
  • Academic Title
    Bachelor of Art - Sociology with Social Sustainability Concentration
  • Course description
    Concentration in Social Sustainability.
    [Concentration Coordinator: Dr. Michael Lustigman and Dr. Loretta Czernis]

    (i)Major in Sociology / Concentration in Social Sustainability (42 credits).
    30 credits are required: SOC 101 (Canadian Society), SOC 102 (Quebec Society), SOC 107 (Canadian First Nations), SOC 110 (Research methodology), SOC 111 (Data Collection /Analysis), SOC 221 (Classical Sociology), SOC 222 (Dialectical Reasoning), SOC 295 (Sustainable Societies), SOC 381 (Media and the Environment), SOC 395 (Advanced Theories of Social Sustainability).

    Majors concentrating in Social Sustainability must also complete 12 credits from the following list of elective courses in this concentration

    (ii) Honours in Sociology / Concentration in Social Sustainability are required to complete the required courses in the Major / Concentration in Social Sustainability, plus SOC 311, SOC 402 and SOC 404, and are also required to complete SOC 315 (Political Sociology in the Digital Era).
    Honours concentrating in Social Sustainability must also complete 15 credits from the following list of elective courses and 3 credits in open electives in Sociology:

    Elective courses for the Honours or Major / Concentration in Social Sustainability:

    BIO 117 General Ecology
    CHE 131 Liberal Arts Chemistry: The Chemistry of Everyday Life
    ECO 237 Economics of the Environment
    ESG 100 Introduction to Environmental Studies
    ESG 126 Introduction to Human Geography
    ESG 224 Human Impact on the Environment
    ESG 266 Environmental Policy
    ESG 268 The Human Landscape and Environmental Change
    ESG 350 Environmental Justice
    HIS 330 Field Trips into Canadian History: Society and the Environment
    SOC 202 Directed Independent Study I
    SOC 203 Directed Independent Study II
    SOC 207 North American First Nations
    SOC 245 Race and Ethnicity
    SOC 250 Collective Behaviour
    SOC 292 Social Policy
    SOC 294 Sociology of Tourism
    SOC 296 Globalism and Culture
    SOC 302 Directed Independent Study III
    SOC 303 Directed Independent Study IV
    SOC 307 Sociology of Health
    SOC 309 Advanced Seminar in Colonization and Decolonization
    SOC 315 Political Sociology in the Digital Era (see requirements for Honours in this concentration)
    SOC 320 Knowledge
    SOC 396 Post Colonial Theory
    ELL 200 Experiential Learning Lab
    ELP 300 Experiential Learning Placement

    SOCIOLOGY PROGRAMS’ COURSES

    Sociology 100ab     Sociological Imagination     3-3-0
    The primary objective of this course is to stimulate curiosity about that part of people’s behaviour that is determined by relationships with others and by membership in groups. This course examines and evaluates the contribution sociology makes to the ongoing process of attempting to understand the surrounding social world. This course is intended for students lacking introductory sociology.
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 100ab     La pensée sociologique     3-3-0
    Ce cours a pour principal but d’éveiller chez l’étudiant le goût du questionnnement et de l’interrogation au sujet des comportements humains determinés par les relations avec d’autres et par les contextes de groupes. L’apport, passé et présent, de la sociologie à la compréhension de l’environnement social, ainsi que les contributions pragmatiques du domaine seront évalués critiquement. Le cours s’adresse aux étudiants n’ayant pas encore touché aux matières d’introduction à la sociologie.
    Staff

    Sociology 101a     Canadian Society     3-3-0
    This course provides an opportunity to examine a variety of aspects of Canadian social structure including stratification and inequality regarding class, gender and ethnicity.
    This course is required of all Sociology Minors, Majors, and Honours students.
    Staff

    Sociology 102b     Québec Society I     3-3-0
    The course presents an analysis of Québec in historical perspective, and examines nationalism, bilingualism and social structures.
    This course is required of all Sociology Minors, Majors, and Honours students.
    Professor Gosselin

    Sociology 105a     Media and Society I     3-3-0
    An introduction to the impact of media upon society and the social structuring of contemporary media as industries which produce values and ideology.
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 107     Canadian First Nations     3-3-0
    An introduction to the study of First Nations in Canada.
    Professor Donnan

    Sociology 110a     Research Methodology     3-3-0
    Sociological research will be dealt with in its quantitative and qualitative orientations. Students will be introduced to techniques of conceptualization, hypothesis formulation, and operationalization.
    This course is required of all Sociology Majors and Honours students.
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 111b     Data Collection/Analysis     3-3-0
    Emphasis will be placed on the construction of different methodological frameworks (survey, experiment, fieldwork, unobtrusive measures) as well as the preparation of adequate methods and techniques for data gathering and analysis (sampling, design, coding, questionnaires, interviews).
    This course is required of all Sociology Majors and Honours students.
    Prerequisite: Sociology 110a
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 129ab     Sex and Gender     3-3-0
    The relation between sex and gender is examined in terms of roles and values, social inequality and transformations in these over time; the interface between class, gender, and ethnicity is examined with regard to specific social problems and theories.
    Staff

    Sociology 155     Sociology of Sport     3-3-0
    A theoretical and empirical introduction to the social organization of sports and how they are mediated.
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 190     Introduction to Postcolonial Study     3-3-0
    An introduction to postcolonial theory and sociological issues arising from the cultural and economic conditions left behind by colonizers and the colonized. By looking at events in countries such as India, Nigeria, the Congo and other former colonies we come to understand the challenge of developing theoretical perspectives which grasp the complex influences of colonizer and colonized upon each other.
    Professor Donnan

    Sociology 202a     Directed Independent Study I     3-3-0
    A tutorial course in which the student (normally a major) may pursue his or her interests in a selected area of sociology, under the direction of a member of the Department.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Department
    Sociology 203b     Directed Independent Study II     3-3-0
    See Sociology 202a.
    Permission of the instructor and the Department

    Sociology 205a     Family I     3-3-0
    Changing forms and functions of the family in Western society; growth and decline of the symmetrical family, definitions, theories, marital and sexual roles, and child rearing.
    Staff

    Sociology 207b     North American First Nations     3-3-0
    The course examines the sociology of strategies of assimilation and the forms of resistance to these strategies in North America.
    Prerequisite: Sociology 107 or permission of the instructor.
    Staff

    Sociology 208ab     Criminology     3-3-0
    A survey of theories of crime and criminality in relation to class, race and gender. Substantive issues will include: murder, prostitution, legal and illegal drug use, woman abuse, white collar crime, and organized crime.
    Staff

    Sociology 209     Young Offenders     3-3-0
    The subject of young offenders in Canada is addressed using both contemporary critical theory and empirical evidence. The topics covered include the treatment of youth in Canada by the justice system, enforcement agencies, and their social realities. Variables of class, social inequality, gender and ethnicity contribute to the examination of the relationships of youth to criminal trends and behaviors patterns.

    Sociology 214ab     Aging     3-3-0
    Aging and the life course perspective. Sociological theories on aging in relation to gender, class, and ethnicity.
    Staff

    Sociology 215ab     Culture, Ethnicity and Aging     3-3-0
    This course is designed to raise an awareness of aging in relation to culture and ethnicity. Concepts and theories of culture, aging and group interaction understood within a Canadian perspective will be provided in addition to sociological examination of class, gender and race.
    Staff

    Sociology 217ab     Social Policy of Aging     3-3-0
    This course will study the content, the interpretation and impact of laws affecting elderly and will examine the evolution of social policies and programs in the province of Quebec and in Canada. It will analyse the principles that the state follows to determine its implication in the field of social and health services to the aging population. The evolution of social policies and programs, the current configuration of governmental resources, community resources, and natural networks will also be examined.

    Sociology 219     Sociology of the Body     3-3-0
    Notions of the body as the cultural representation of our contemporary “embodied” selves will be explored. This course will uncover the strategies of social, political and economic forces as theses problematize the body and seek to control, manipulate, and alter behaviour.
    Professor Gosselin

    Sociology 220ab     Work and Leisure     3-3-0
    Industrial and “post-industrial” societies, especially Canada, are examined within a world-system framework. The focus is on power dynamics, contemporary and theoretical issues, involving workers, professionals, owners and consumers.
    Formerly called “Industrial Sociology I”.
    Staff

    Sociology 221a     Classical Sociology     3-3-0
    An introduction to the nature and purpose of sociological theory and reasoning through a critical examination of the work of Durkheim and Weber.
    This course is required of all Sociology Majors and Honours students.
    Formally called Soc 121.
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 222b     Dialectical Reasoning     3-3-0
    In tracing the tradition which collects Plato, Marx and Simmel, this course seeks to examine the place of dialectical theory and reasoning in sociology.
    This course is required of all Sociology Majors and Honours students.
    Formally called Soc 122.
    Prerequisite: Sociology 221 (formally Soc 121) or permission of the instructor
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 223ab     Women and Global Inequality     3-3-0
    This course considers the social location of women within a political economy of globalization. Understanding women’s diverse lives requires attention to public, private, local, regional, national and global factors.
    Staff

    Sociology 225ab     Québec Society II     3-3-0
    Selected topics for analysis of the values, ideologies, behaviour patterns and material culture of Québec society. The course critically examines Québec society during modernity and early post-modernity and draws heavily on artistic and cultural representations (painting, sculpture, literature, etc.)
    It is recommended that students take Soc 102 or Soc 101 prior to this
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 229b     Communications: Gender and Culture     3-3-0
    This course examines how society defines gender through communication and what that means for our institutional and personal lives, safety, relationships, and professional opportunities. The focus is on how men and women participate in the social construction of gender, its impacts, and efforts to achieve equality. Topics include: gendered identities, gendered verbal and non-verbal communication about race, gender and violence in the workplace and other institutional or personal settings.
    Staff

    Sociology 230ab     Deviance I     3-3-0
    Definitions of deviant behaviour, social roles of deviants and the structure of control.
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 235ab     Women and the Penal System     3-3-0
    A critical understanding of gender in criminology. Substantive issues will include: Sexual assault and the justice system, women and family law in the courts, domestic violence, gender and murder. Contemporary theories in criminology and their application are examined.
    Staff

    Sociology 241ab     Cinema     3-3-0
    Culture phenomena and values such as: class interest, gender roles, important events, national character and foreign policy, the ideal family, the deviant, etc., are reflected and contested in film. Students will be exposed to and discuss a variety of theories and methods of analysing culture by way of film as industry and meaning creation.
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 245ab     Race and Ethnicity     3-3-0
    The sociology of multiethnic and multiracial societies examines social conflicts over the distribution of resources and power; racism and multicultural ideologies are examined.
    Professor Gosselin

    Sociology 250b     Collective Behaviour     3-3-0
    Macro-structures of society such as crowds, publics, fads and riots are examined, including evolving collectivities and their subsequent ideological transformations.
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 260a     Community     3-3-0
    A comparative and historical analysis of rural, urban, and ethnic communities.
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 280a     Interpersonal Communication     3-3-0
    Human interaction at the macrosociological level. Equality, domination, integration, marginalization, co-operation and conflict will be examined.
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 281b     Communications Methods     3-3-0
    Research in the areas of interpersonal, organizational and mass communication. Methods particular to communications studies are examined and applied.
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 290ab     Contemporary Theory     3-3-0
    A survey of twentieth century theory through a variety of schools including symbolic interactionism, functionalism, neo-Marxism, feminism, modernism and postmodernism.
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 291b     Sociology of Art     3-3-0
    An introduction to the Sociological study of the Arts. The course focuses on the social practices and organizational frameworks related to artistic production/creation, mediation processes, and the reception of art works and artists. Attention will be given to issues related to race, gender, class, and power.
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 292     Social Policy     3-3-0
    Introduction to the sociological study of social policy in the Canadian context. The course will examine civil society in relation to a rapidly changing policy context. The development and outcomes of policy will be investigated from a number of theoretical perspectives.
    Prerequisites: None
    Staff

    Sociology 293     Visual Sociology     3-3-0
    We live in cultures which are saturated with digital information and new media. This course engages with major thinkers who study the use of photographs, film, and video to understand society. The course is organized around a series of ideas and problems involving intersections between theory and practice.
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 294     Sociology of Tourism     3-3-0
    Travel, journeys and their associated human migrations are the key areas of focus in this course. While movement for purposes of rest and recreation has always been part of our collective legacy, in this world of increasing globalization, the mass tourist industry and a variety of leisure activities has helped transform many locations around the globe. The course will explore tourism, in all its forms and the impact of traveling, both positive and negative, on cultures, sustainability and the environment.
    Professor Gosselin

    Sociology 295     Sustainable Societies     3-3-0
    This course addresses concepts of social and cultural sustainability. Key questions concerning the environmental impacts of social organization as well as options for change will be considered.
    Professor Donnan

    Sociology 296     Globalism and Culture     3-3-0
    An introduction to key concepts for the current understanding and applications of cultural and social globalization.

    Sociology 299/EDU303     Sociology of Education     3-3-0
    Comparative study of the Canadian education system and processes in light of current sociological theory and research
    Staff

    Sociology 301b     Aspects of Sociological Inquiry     3-3-0
    The relationships between language and inquiry will be examined with reference to the works of contemporary sociological theorists.
    Prerequisites: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 302a     Directed Independent Study III     3-3-0
    See Sociology 202a.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Department

    Sociology 303b     Directed Independent Study IV     3-3-0
    See Sociology 202a.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Department.

    Sociology 305b     Family II: Selected Topics     3-3-0
    An advanced seminar on selected issues affecting the family in historical and contemporary settings involving the relationship between public and private spheres and between production and reproduction.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Staff

    Sociology 307     Sociology of Health     3-3-0
    This course seeks to examine the place of health and illness in society, the relationship between bio-medical problems and the social, political and economic realities that help shape them. Topics will include poverty and health, mental illness, aging, death and dying, professionalism, health service organization, inequalities in health service access and use, recent policies and difficulties with health care reform.

    Sociology 308b     Formal Organization     3-3-0
    The institutionalization and legitimation of power and decision-making processes. Special emphasis is given to innovation and deviance in formal organizations.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor.
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 309     Advanced Seminar in Global Colonization and Decolonization     3-3-0
    Colonialism and imperialism are considered in relation to settler societies and global power structure. This course questions theories of decolonization and liberation in the context of cultural and economic empires.
    Prerequisite: Six courses in Sociology including one of the following: Sociology 190, Sociology 207, Sociology 245, Sociology 296
    Professor Donnan

    Sociology 311b     Quantitative Tools for Social Research     3-3-0
    A critical review of statistical methods frequently used in social research.
    Prerequisites: Sociology 110 and 111, or permission of instructor.
    Required for Honours Sociology students.
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 315ab     Political Sociology in the Digital Era     3-3-0
    This course examines the state and policy making in Canadian and global contexts, from a sociological perspective. Marxist, feminist and traditional theories are examined.
    Prerequisites: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 320ab     Knowledge     3-3-0
    How do we know what we know?An analysis of the role of ideas in the development of social institutions and the impact of belief systems on social values. Science, politics, education, religion, the arts and the professions are examined.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 321b     Sociology of Technology     3-3-0
    This course treats the social meanings of work and leisure in industrial and “post-industrial” societies.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Staff
    Sociology 322ab     Urban Sociology     3-3-0
    Theories of urban growth and development; comparative analysis of cities and their problems.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Gosselin

    Sociology 331b     Deviance II: Selected Topics     3-3-0
    Selected topics such as drugs, homosexuality, prostitution and juvenile delinquency will be discussed.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 340b     Women: Theory and Ideology     3-3-0
    Women are viewed as both object and subject of ideological and theoretical discourses. Oppression and liberation are investigated from a variety of theoretical perspectives.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Gosselin

    Sociology 361b     Ethnographics     3-3-0
    The emphasis is upon understanding and utilizing ethnographic methods in the examination of societal events and relationships, in terms of how these are perceived and socially organized.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Lustigman

    Sociology 381ab     Media and the Environment     3-3-0
    This course examines processes of technologically mediated interaction at the macrosociological level. Trends and structures of mass culture and communications are examined in relation to how we relate to nature.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Czernis

    Sociology 390ab     Social Justice and Contemporary Theory     3-3-0
    The course focuses on the effort to develop a credible progressive vision of an alternative to the present social order given the collapse of socialism as the principal ideal that inspired many struggles for social transformation over the last century. Included is an assessment of the emergence of neo-liberalism and the decentering of class in contemporary theory. The course also investigates efforts to develop a theory of social justice that includes both recognition and redistribution claims.
    Prerequisite: Students should have 9 credits in Sociology or permission of the instructor
    Professor Coulter

    Sociology 395     Advanced Theories of Social Sustainability     3-3-0
    Advanced seminar on the dynamics of global and local relationships regarding the nature of sustainable societies.
    Prerequisite: Six courses in sociology including Sociology 295 or permission of instructor.
    Professor Donnan

    Sociology 396     Post Colonial Theory     3-3-0
    Advanced seminar in contemporary postcolonial theories.
    Prerequisite: Six courses in Sociology including Sociology 296 or permission of instructor.
    Professor Donnan

    Sociology 402a     Honours I: Special Topics     3-3-0
    The course accommodates the study of particular sociological topics at an advanced undergraduate level. Subjects will vary from year to year.
    Required for Honours Sociology students; normally to be taken in the final year.
    Prerequisite: The completion of all required courses within the Major
    Staff

    Sociology 404b     Honours II: Research Strategies     3-3-0
    This course examines research procedures, the objectives and limits of particular approaches, and the relationships between theory, research strategy and its application.
    Required for Honours Sociology students
    Prerequisite: Sociology 402 and completion of all required courses in the Major
    Staff

    Sociology 450     Thesis     6-0-0
    Supervised honours research project under the direction of an instructor. This is an option for Honours Sociology students only and must be submitted to the Department upon completion.
    Prerequisite: The completion of all required courses within the Major and the permission of the Departmental member who acts as the thesis advisor.
    Normally taken along with 402 and 404 in the final year of the Honours Sociology program.
    Staff

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