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Bachelor of Applied Business - International Business Management

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  • Objectives
    This program is designed to prepare students to handle managerial issues in Human Resources and Operations Management requiring contextual knowledge of international business practices. The goal is to provide graduates with the ability to bring people, process and technology together to achieve improved performance in business, whether that business operates in the domestic or international arena.
  • Practical experience
    There is a co-op option associated with this program.
  • Academic Title
    Bachelor of Applied Business - International Business Management
  • Course description
    Level One
    BUS1190     Introduction to Business with International Applications
    Description: This course will provide an starting point to understanding the functions of business and the similarities and differences between Canadian business and business operations in other countries. Economic systems and forms of business organization will be evaluated. The major functions of business (management, human resources, production, marketing and finance) will be examined in the Canadian environment and compared to the international environment.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    COMM1640     International Communications
    Description: International Communications focuses on communications in an international business environment. Students will use the topic of international communications as source material for practicing and improving writing skills and reading comprehension. Both individually and in collaborative groups, the students will acquire research and presentations skills as they analyze and synthesize texts. Students will also perform oral presentations and examine the multi-cultural context of business writing teams.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    ECON1050     Introduction to Microeconomics
    Description: This Degree Level course introduces students to basic microeconomic terminology, concepts, methodology and theories, and provides an understanding of firm behaviour under various market structures in an international setting, and their application to current global microeconomic issues. Topics of study include: supply and demand, elasticity concepts and their application; consumer theory; production, costs, and the determination of equilibrium price and output under different market models- perfect competition, monopolistic competition, monopoly and oligopoly; government export taxes/subsidies and regulation of the market, and international trade.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    FND1035     Foundation Module
    Description: During this course, the student will learn to effectively use the Windows operating system, apply word processing techniques, create basic business presentations, and exploit the power of spreadsheets. Students will also learn the skills necessary to operate effectively within the Conestoga College computing environment. An emphasis will be placed on the development of solutions to business problems using commonly available microcomputer tools.

    This course will also provide the student with a mathematical basis for personal and business financial decisions. This course stresses business applications using arithmetic, algebra, ratio-proportion and graphing. Applications include payroll, cost-volume-profit analysis and merchandising mathematics. This course stresses logical reasoning and problem solving skills. A Texas Instrument BAII ?Plus? calculator is required.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    LIBS7150     Personal Awareness and Group Dynamics
    Description: Self-awareness, interpersonal communication and team work are essential elements in both work and social settings. An experiential approach ? learning by doing - assists the participant to become an effective individual and group member. Individual and team activities will enhance participants’ skills to work with a variety of personalities in diverse situations.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    LIBS7200     World Cultures
    Description: In this course students will identify and examine themes and issues in cultural diversity. Students will focus on topics pertaining to similarities and variations in various social settings, including: race, ethnicity, and religion. Incorporating social and legal explanations of diversity, students develop an understanding of the impacted groups and develop strategies which demonstrate respect of diversity.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MATH1775     Business Math
    Description: The purpose of this degree-level course is to provide the student with a full spectrum of problem solving tools within the Mathematics of Finance. Topics include: Simple interest and discount, compound interest and discount, annuities and their many applications including amortization, Canadian mortgages, bonds and perpetuities. The course also covers business investment decisions and an introduction to Probability Theory.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    MKT1090     Marketing
    Description: This degree level course introduces the basic theories and concepts in marketing as well as an understanding of how these concepts are applied in the management of a company. The application of the marketing concept is illustrated. Other topics include examination of environmental factors, ethics and social responsibility, theories of buying behavior, primary and secondary research, industrial and consumer markets, targeting and positioning.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    Level Two
    ACCT1210     Introductory Accounting
    Description: The understanding of basic accounting is critical for managers in any environment. This introductory course provides an overview of the fundamental concepts for financial accounting. Students will be able to explain financial accounting terminology, classify the components of financial statements and prepare financial statements.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    BUS1200     Organizational Behaviour
    Description: This degree level course is a study of group behaviour and how the effective use of best practices must be adapted for use in an international setting. Topics include motivation; group dynamics; roles, norms and status; decision-making; power and control; conflict; and leadership.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    COMM2090     Applied Communications
    Description: This course focuses on business communications for domestic and international audiences. Building on the skills developed in COMM 1610, students will study the principles of business communication for managers and apply them to planning, drafting, and writing reports, presentations, instructions/procedure messages, and evaluations. They will adopt an intercultural perspective to business as they create effective documents and oral presentations based on a selection of case studies. Through individual and collaborative projects, students will improve their research and professional oral presentation skills.

    The case-study approach ties this applied communications course to the relevant first- and second-year courses in global cultures, management, international marketing, accounting, international trade, organizational behaviour, supervisory practices, human resources and operations management in an international context.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: COMM1610

    ECON2030     Introduction to Macroeconomics
    Description: This Degree Level course deals with aggregate economic activity in the Canadian economy and its interrelationship with the rest of the world. It provides students with a basic understanding of macroeconomic principles and their relevance to macroeconomic issues impacting Canadian society. It examines the structure and performance of the Canadian economy utilizing such economic indicators as gross domestic product, employment, unemployment, income and productivity growth, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates, balance of international payments and the impact of government fiscal and monetary policies in an international setting. It will analyze current global issues affecting the Canadian economy.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    LIBS7170     Critical and Creative Thinking Skills
    Description: This course examines the essential elements of both critical and creative thinking, with their application to the solution of problems. It describes the nature of evidence, sound arguments and valid conclusions, faulty reasoning, convergent and divergent thinking, and the creative process. Critical and creative thinking are then applied to problem solving, and both the discussion of ideas and the presentation of information to an audience.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MATH1785     Applied Statistics and Research Methods
    Description: During this degree level course students will explore basic statistical and research methods and their application to data analysis. Students will develop skills at reading and understanding research literature, and will develop expertise in evaluating the validity and reliability of research data. Students will acquire hands-on experience by working in small teams on a research project: designing, collecting data, analyzing the data using Microsoft Excel and reporting their findings and conclusions.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: MATH1770 or MATH1775

    OPER1260     Manufacturing Concepts
    Description: The Manufacturing Concepts course is focused on the manufacturing/operations activities of organizations which create the products used in the global economy. This course will examine the major elements of the design and management of a manufacturing operation. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies and the effective utilization of resources to add value to the supply chains in which they operate, thereby improving their competitive position in the global economy.
    Hours: 49
    Credits: 3

    Level Three

    ACCT2500     Managerial Accounting
    Description: This degree-level course provides students with an understanding of the types and behaviours of costs used by managers in the planning, decision-making and budgeting processes. Students will categorize the components of a costing system and calculate product cost under different methods. Management accounting topics will allow the student to understand cost behaviour and its use in decision making, evaluate capital investments and prepare operating budgets.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: BUS1190

    COMP2370     Information Management
    Description: This course is an overview of the nature of information and its use in business. Topics will include: computer hardware and software architecture, telecommunications and the Internet, database management, decision support systems, eCommerce, systems acquisition process, and security, global and ethical issues.
    The concepts are reinforced with practical exercises to develop the students' competency using end user application software including word processing, spreadsheet, presentation graphics, Internet browser and email.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    LIBS7180     Interpersonal Conflict Management Skills
    Description: Without exception, every relationship of any depth has conflict. Conflict can be regarded as a negative force to be avoided or controlled, or it can be seen as an opportunity for strengthening relationships, self-awareness and development. The course will examine different factors that contribute to interpersonal and intrapersonal (intrapsychic) conflicts and discuss and apply appropriate skills and strategies to manage conflicts effectively.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MGMT2085     Supervisory Practices in an International Environment
    Description: This course will provide students with the skills required to be effective supervisors, the principles of supervision and the challenges presented by a front line supervisory role. Discussion and application of topics will centre around the role of supervisor and the unique skills required to be effective as a front line supervisor in an international environment or within a multicultural organization.
    Hours: 49
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: BUS1200

    MKT2200     International Marketing
    Description: This is a degree level course in International Marketing designed to expose students to challenges and opportunities that exist in a global environment. Students will examine all aspects of managing the marketing function in an international setting. Students will gain an understanding of key concepts and theories through readings and lectures. Students will develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills through in-class discussions and analysis of case studies. Students will apply their knowledge in presentations and by developing an international marketing plan.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: BUS1190

    OPER2010     Operations Management
    Description: This Operations Management course focuses on the functional activities and role of an operations manager in both domestic and international settings. Students will build upon their knowledge of manufacturing concepts gained in the first year of study and learn to implement the functions and the strategic objectives of an operations manager. The major focus of this course is on the development and utilization of strategies for continuous improvement of both productivity and quality in organizations engaged in manufacturing, supply chain and service oriented businesses.
    Hours: 49
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: BUS1190

          Electives: General Education

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

    Level Four
    BUS2200     Canadian and International Business Law
    Description: This course is an introduction to the various international legal systems which can affect Canadian business. Students will compare and contrast the Canadian legal system to those of major trading partners and will assess the manner in which these differences or similarities can govern commercial relationships. Students will assess how the Canadian system functions in the context of the legal systems governing other nations and governing international commerce. To this end the course will examine both the substantial and procedural aspects of the Canadian and international laws governing contracts, conflict of laws and international and domestic dispute resolution.
    Hours: 75
    Credits: 5

    COMP2105     Database Management
    Description: This course will introduce the student in the use of relational database management systems to manage operations for international organizations. Students will also be introduced the concept of data analysis and decision support with an emphasis in the basics of data warehouses.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: COMP1370 or COMP2370

    FIN2105     Finance for Managers
    Description: All managers in an international environment need financial management skills to make decisions and manage projects within an organization. This introductory course covers aspects of financial management. Students will be able to apply concepts of finance for organizations operating in international environments. Students will develop an appreciation for the techniques used to control financial risk in international situations.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: MATH1785

    HRM2100     Human Resource Management
    Description: This course will introduce students to the field of Human Resources Management and the typical functional areas and activities which support this discipline within an organization. The focus will be on developing an appreciation for the changing role of Human Resource departments, from service function to strategic partner, and the way in which today's Human Resource departments can help organizations achieve key international objectives with superior levels of effectiveness, efficiency, quality and profitability in order to create unique competitive advantages which are likely to endure. Students will analyze human resource management practices from an international perspective considering strengths and challenges that companies face in establishing international operations and in running them successfully.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: BUS1200

    LIBS7190     Ethical Reasoning Skills
    Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the intellectual tradition of moral philosophy and help them develop practical analytic and critical skills through reading, writing, and discussion. This course focuses on ethical issues faced by individuals in Canadian society. It helps students to clarify their values and establish a framework for ethical decision making. Students will explore a variety of moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, minority rights, racism, bio-medical technology, capital punishment, pornography, discrimination, poverty, environment and war. These questions do not admit of easy answers, because there are often plausible-sounding moral reasons to be given on each side of the matter. In part because of this, there is a tendency to want to set them aside as unanswerable, as just a matter of opinion. Yet they cannot be ignored. Rather, these questions require that we think hard about them and address them carefully, and that we explore various underlying presuppositions that we often accept uncritically. As a result, this is a course in which we will focus on and practice the skill of critical thinking, and learn to express carefully, verbally and in writing, our reasoning for a given position.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MGMT2095     Project Management
    Description: Management of large scale projects is both a science and an art. This course will focus on Project Management as an essential component of managing both international and domestic operations and an evolving professional discipline. All projects are typically complex, are comprised of many components and tasks, and involve a cross-section of different functional teams. The essential knowledge areas which are vital to effective project management (integration, scope, cost, time, quality, human resources, communication, risk and procurement) will be explored in detail. As well, the key processes involved with successful project management (initiation, planning, controlling, executing and closing) will be reviewed. Students will have an opportunity to apply these skills and knowledge to a variety of real world situations and to utilize information technology to identify opportunities for improvement.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

          Electives: General Education

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

    Level Five
    CDEV1020     Co-op and Career Preparation
    Description: This mandatory course prepares students for job searching for their co-op work terms and for post-graduate careers. Students will learn to critically evaluate their skills, attitudes, and expectations and evaluate and interpret available opportunities in the workplace. Self-marketing techniques using resumes, cover letters, cold-calls, and interviewing will be learned and students will learn the expectations, rules, and regulations that apply in the workplace with regards to social, organizational, ethical, and safety issues.
    Hours: 16
    Credits: 1

    ECON3020     Economics of International Trade and Finance
    Description: This course introduces concepts and theories of international trade and finance, and provides students with an understanding of international economics from the perspective of the firm and Canada as a whole. Microeconomic models will be utilized to analyze the effects of international trade on individuals and businesses, and on trade policies. Included is the theory of comparative advantage and the gains from trade; the Heckscher-Ohlin factor-proportions model; tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade, and economic integration. Topics for international finance include: the balance of payments, exchange rate systems and the foreign exchange market, and the international monetary system. Current international economic issues pertinent to Canada will be examined including Canadian trade patterns, foreign investment, free trade agreements, bilateral and multilateral trade disputes, the impact of exchange rate changes, and Canadian macroeconomic policy in an open economy.
    Hours: 75
    Credits: 5
    Pre-Requisites: ECON1050, ECON2030

    HRM3040     Staff Recruitment and Selections
    Description: Using a systems based approach to the staffing function, this course examines the issues and practices involved with the critical function of acquiring and deploying an organization’s workforce, in both domestic and international settings, and in developing and implementing programs for the effective orientation of new staff. This course will analyze international business situations and challenges related to staffing for an international business environment using staff who are both Canadian and foreign nationals/international.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: HRM2100

    HRM3050     Labour and Employee Relations
    Description: This course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive range of knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours needed to effectively manage employees in unionized environments and to foster a positive relationship with unions in domestic and international settings. Relevant domestic legislation in federal and provincial jurisdictions will be studied in detail including the historical, social and economic factors leading to its development.

    Students will contrast and compare this domestic experience with international trends and legislation governing the labour movement in several other jurisdictions. Particular emphasis will be placed on conducting a comparative analysis of the major labour relations functions across industries and countries. Philosophical and organizational differences between Canadian unions and unions in other parts of the world will be explored.

    Students will explore the differences which have developed between private and public sector unions, internationally as well as within Canada.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: HRM2100

    LIBS7040     Science, Technology and Society
    Description: This theme-based course aims to provide an understanding of the historical, social, economic and political context within which scientific and technological advancement takes place. Innovation is a social product, often an expression of current ideology or a response to a social need. Conversely technological and scientific innovation can transform the structure of society, its value system, and institutions. Through a series of lectures and student-centered activities, this course will assess the impact, the benefits, consequences and implications of the inter-relationship between society and science and technology.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    OPER3020     Logistics and Supply Chain Management
    Description:
    The supply chain management course is focused on the functions and objectives of a logistics manager, whether operating domestically or within an international setting. Students will investigate many examples of the classic cost/service tradeoff that is the major challenge for all supply chain managers. The major emphasis of the course is on the utilization of strategies to add value to a company’s supply chain by either reducing costs, improving efficiency or effectiveness or improving customer service. This course will demonstrate the important role of the supply chain to companies by examining international vendors, customers and distribution centers with the goal of maximizing company productivity in a global economy and taking advantage of global opportunities.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: OPER2010

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

    Level Six
    BUS3130     Consulting/Integration Project I
    Description: This course is designed to provide the student with a real life consulting and integration opportunity with respect to operational activities in a global business environment. Sensitivity will be demonstrated in all areas of a project assignment. Key topics include: goal setting, identifying dependency relationships, outlining resources required, concurrent activity management, decision theory, monitoring and controlling of progress which will result in the successful completion of projects. Students are required to, with their faculty member and employer, select aspects of the employer’s operations for study with the view to producing a report which justifies the reasons for the selection, the purpose of the project, the methodology and approach adopted. As necessary, seminars on writing strategies will be delivered to students. The student will also summarize the actual outcomes of the project and conclude with a series of recommendations/observations along with cost/commercial considerations. The work of the student focuses on a number of critical activities and skills involved in economic, operational and people management. It will provide the student with ?hard practice? in applying theory and skills developed in the various courses taken previously. Tasks and assignments are established which require the student to integrate his/her knowledge of different global and domestic business concepts and then apply them to problem solving specific areas of the business environment at hand.
    Hours: 105
    Credits: 7
    Pre-Requisites: HRM2100, MKT2200, OPER2010, MGMT2080 or MGMT2085, FIN2100 or FIN2105

    ECON3030     International Labour Economics/Markets
    Description: This Degree Level course will provide students with pertinent labour economic concepts and an understanding of the varying structure, conduct and performance characteristics of labour markets, and their relevance for human resource decisions in a global marketplace. Canadian labour market behaviour and outcomes will be analyzed comparatively with Canada's key trading partners with a particular view toward decision making and applications. Topics of study include: labour supply and demand, labour force participation rates, employment and unemployment, wage and employment determination under various labour economic models, the wage structure, productivity and international competitiveness, labour unions, and the role and impact of government in the labour market. Contemporary Canadian and international labour market issues will be examined.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ECON1050, ECON2030

    HRM3030     Training and Development
    Description: During this course, the training and development life cycle will be explored in depth. Topics will include: needs assessment methods, formulation of training objectives, designing training programs, assessment of training methods, and international factors in training and development. Adult learning theories will be discussed so that students can better understand the ways in which a positive transfer of training can be encouraged. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of training and development activities into the strategic plan of the organization. A portion of the course will be skill based to enable students to develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary to become an effective trainer. Emphasis will be placed on the application of training and development principles and models to international situations given the challenges and opportunities associated with doing business in an international setting.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: HRM2100

    HRM3060     Human Resources Information Systems
    Description: The purpose of the course is to develop an integrated body of information systems knowledge and skills that apply to human resources management. It includes an in-depth study of the end-user approach to systems analysis, addressing the links between information systems technology, people, and organizations. The course provides a comprehensive, thoroughly up-to-date treatment of human resource information system design, analysis, and implementation with a practical focus on shaping the information system to enhance employee performance and carry out ?real world? business strategies. Topics include information enterprise applications (CRM/ERM, ERP), systems design and analysis, justifying information technology investments, selecting and evaluating information systems and technologies, e-business, and information systems security.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: COMP2105

    MGMT3120     Managing Business Performance (Multinationals)
    Description: This degree level course deals with the techniques needed to take the true pulse of an organization and to assess its overall health using a wide variety of approaches including Balanced Scorecard, Six Sigma, Diamond E, Resource-based competitiveness, and Michael Porter’s work. The key focus will be on identifying and achieving improved performance levels in an internaitonal environment at individual, business process, job, organization and corporate levels. The challenges and opportunities involved with identifying necessary changes at micro and macro levels, and with designing interventions to implement them effectively, will be explored. Using a systems based view of the firm, the role of organizational design, resourcing, culture, reward systems, disciplinary interventions, stakeholder expectations and the performance management system will be explored within the unique context of the multinational firm. From a practical perspective, students will explore the challenges and difficulties involved with managing the business performance system, particularly in a global context. Both static and dynamic approaches to assessing and managing macro level issues will be explored. At a micro level, students will also review effective interventions to improve individual performance gaps.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: HRM2100, MKT2200, OPER2010, FIN2100 or FIN2105, MGMT2080 or MGMT2085

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

    Level Seven
    COOP3160     Co-op Work Term I (International Business Management)
    Description: This course will provide students with college-approved work experience in an international or domestic business environment. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to the attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance promotional opportunities. In addition to these employability skills, the student will also have an opportunity to apply technical material from the prior semesters of study to real life situations. These essential employability and technical skills areas will be improved during the work term while the student responsibly performs the duties as laid out in the job description, in accordance with course and program outcomes.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14
    Pre-Requisites: BUS3130, ECON3030, HRM3060, MGMT3120

    Level Eight
    COOP4000     Co-op Work Term II (International Business Management)
    Description: This course will provide students with college-approved work experience in an international or domestic business environment. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to the attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance promotional opportunities. In addition to these employability skills, the student will also have an opportunity to apply technical material from the prior semesters of study to real life situations. These essential employability and technical skills areas will be improved during the work term while the student responsibly performs the duties as laid out in the job description, in accordance with course and program outcomes.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Nine

    BUS4020     International Business Planning and Strategy
    Description: This is a capstone course for students requiring them to apply the principles and knowledge obtained in all other business disciplines to a specific business situation whether domestic or international. The course uses a broad theoretical perspective combined with experiential learning to equip students with the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours needed to effectively participate in the development of overall strategy and operational tactics and to prepare students to participate in the stratetgic planning process within a global economy. Adopting a resource based view of the firm, students will be exposed to leading strategic theories and tactics at global, corporate, business unit and functional levels. Students will be asked to analyze sources of competitive advantage and profitability using a wide range of approaches to develop a comprehensive SWOT and to formulate realistic recommendations. Differences among embryonic, growth and mature industries, and the techniques needed to prosper in technologically driven industries, will be examined. Specific challenges and techniques associated with entry into international markets will be explored, along with the challenges associated with resource allocation. Students will have an opportunity to explore techniques used to foster B2B and B2C relationships.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    BUS4030     Learning Organizations
    Description: This course will focus on the characteristics of learning organizations and the challenges and opportunities associated with changing reorienting an organization's culture towards this model in both domestic and international contexts. Students will analyze the characteristics of leadership styles within learning organizations with a view to assessing how best to engender curiosity, flexibility, and awareness and some of the cultural barriers which may inhibit these objectives. Students will analyze techniques and models used to foster a culture within which employees can expand their capacity to create results they truly desire, are allowed to take risks and make mistakes, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured and where people are continually learning how to learn together, thereby improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the organization over the long term.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    BUS4040     Organizational Effectiveness I - Organizational Development
    Description: This course introduces the student to organizational development theories and their application in an organizational setting. Consideration is given to the psychological, sociological, and historical constructs upon which the field is based. Students will learn the foundations for the key theories as well as the practical work of important theorists. Students will also examine how the theories of organizational development are being applied in organizations to foster change, innovation, and the revitalization of the organization.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    BUS4050     Quality Management
    Description: The effective and efficient management of an organization's total operation requires sound principles of quality management practiced in all three planning areas (strategic, tactical, and operational). This course provides a fundamental, yet comprehensive, coverage of Total Quality Management (TQM). It covers not only the principles and practices, but also the tools and techniques. The sensitivity to end customers' requirements and challenges re a competitor will be a theme of the course. A practical state-of-the-art approach is stressed throughout this course. Sufficient theory and application techniques will be presented to ensure that the student has a sound understanding of TQM concepts. Mathematical techniques are developed in the form of tables and charts. Awareness of the internal and external requirements for quality principles in all currently practiced forms will be explored.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    BUS4060     Consulting/Integration Project II
    Description: This course is designed to provide the student with a real life consulting and integration opportunity with respect to strategic, tactical, and operational activities in a global business environment. Sensitivity will be demonstrated in all areas of a project assignment. Key topics include goal setting, identifying dependency relationships, outlining resources required, concurrent activity management, decision theory, monitoring, and controlling of progress to result in the successful completion of projects. Students are required to " with their faculty member, and employer " select aspects of the employer's operations for study " with the view to producing a report which justifies the reasons for the selection, the purpose of the project, the methodology and approach adopted. Also, the student will summarize the actual outcomes of the project, and conclude with a series of recommendations/ observations along with cost/commercial considerations. The work of the student focuses on a number of critical activities and skills involved in contemporary globalization: economic, strategic, tactical, and operational, and provides the student with 'hard practice' in applying theory and skills developed in the various courses taken. Tasks and assignments are established which require the student to integrate his/her knowledge of different financing, operational, marketing, global and domestic business concepts, and then apply them to problem solving specific areas of the business environment at hand.
    Hours: 105
    Credits: 7

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

    Level Ten

    BUS4070     Consulting/Integration Project III
    Description: This course is designed to provide the student with a real life consulting and integration opportunity with respect to strategic, tactical, and operational activities in a global business environment. Sensitivity will be demonstrated in all areas of a project assignment. Key topics include goal setting, identifying dependency relationships, outlining resources required, concurrent activity management, decision theory, monitoring, and controlling of progress to result in the successful completion of projects. Students are required to " with their faculty member, and employer " select aspects of the employer's operations for study " with the view to producing a report which justifies the reasons for the selection, the purpose of the project, the methodology and approach adopted. Also, the student will summarize the actual outcomes of the project, and conclude with a series of recommendations/observations along with cost/commercial considerations. The work of the student focuses on a number of critical activities and skills involved in contemporary globalization, economic, strategic, tactical, and operational, and provides the student with 'hard practice' in applying theory and skills developed in the various courses taken. Tasks and assignments are established which require the student to integrate his/her knowledge of different financing, operational, marketing, global and domestic business concepts, and then apply them to problem solving specific areas of the business environment at hand.
    Hours: 105
    Credits: 7
    Pre-Requisites: BUS4060

    BUS4080     Organizational Effectiveness II - Change Management
    Description: These courses will review how companies can evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of their current methods of operations, equipment, and organizational structure, and then plan improvement strategies tailored to their particular needs. Companies must be organized around four major areas of practice: customer focus, continuous improvement, total participation, and networking. Emphasis will be given to creating an implementation plan for an effective change management process.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: BUS4040, LIBS7180, MGMT2090 or MGMT2095

    BUS4090     Business Process Reengineering
    Description: This course is designed to equip the student with the knowledge, skills and behaviours necessary to respond to a rapidly changing marketplace. Business Process Reengineering is the comprehensive process of reconfiguring the basic structure and relationships of individuals within an organization by removing unneeded activities, taking advantage of automation opportunities, and rewriting basic process models and expectations for each process. Students will acquire knowledge and skills to reduce costs, downsize, reorganize, reduce cycle time, and improve service and customer satisfaction in order to implement a redesign of a company's processes, organization and culture to achieve an increase in the company's performance.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    HRM4030     Strategic Compensation Management
    Description: This course addresses tangible and intangible compensation and the use of compensation to motivate and reward employee performance in both domestic and international environments. The application of compensation principles to organizational objectives is studied and evaluated, with particular emphasis on cultural variations and sensitivities. This course also covers job analysis, job description, and job evaluation on the basis of compensable factors as well as designing an equitable pay structure. Strategic use of compensation systems for attracting, motivating, and retaining employees is incorporated with managerial aspects of paying employees at all organizational levels. Focusing on managing employee compensation in contemporary organizations, the major objectives are: to examine the current state of compensation decision making; to examine how recent theoretical and research developments inform compensation decisions; and to offer an opportunity to develop competencies in making compensation decisions. International variations in laws and expectations for compensation will be assessed.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ACCT2500, HRM3040, HRM3050

    MGMT4100     Stakeholder Management
    Description: This course explores the evolution and implementation of responsibility management systems that operationalize corporate citizenship, which are comparable in many respects to quality and environmental management systems. Modern corporations can no longer operate as autonomous, single-minded organizations. Without exception, the external environments that they face are complex, dynamic, and unpredictable. Companies today are caught in a crossfire of external (and sometimes internal) demands related to how they manage their responsibilities to a wide range of stakeholders, including employees, investors, suppliers, customers, communities, and national governments where they operate, particularly where long supply chains exist in developing nations. As a result of these conditions, corporations can be seen creating dialogue, relationships, and formal inter-organizational ties to a broad number of other parties and constituencies. In addition, those other parties and constituencies are exerting considerable influence on the formulation and execution of strategies. In large measure, the strategic management of these relationships is a keystone to business success in the new millennium.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours
          

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