Master of Science in Physics

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Comments about Master of Science in Physics - At the institution - Montreal - Québec

  • Objectives
    The master’s program of the department is oriented towards fundamental and applied research and reflects the specialties of the faculty. The objectives of the program are to give students as high and pertinent a training as possible for further research in universities or the private sector.
  • Academic Title
    Master of Science in Physics
  • Course description
    All courses are worth 3 credits each unless otherwise specified. The graduate courses offered by the Department of Physics fall into the following categories:

    PHYS 600-609 Topics in Quantum and High Energy Physics
    PHYS 630-639 Topics in Condensed Matter Physics
    PHYS 640-649 Topics in Theoretical Physics
    PHYS 670-679 Topics in Applied Physics

    Topics in Quantum and High Energy Physics (600-609)

    PHYS 601 Advanced Quantum Mechanics I (3 credits)

    This course reviews the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics, Heisenberg, Schroedinger, and interaction representations; time-dependent perturbation theory and the golden rule; collision theory, Born approximation, T-matrix and phase shifts; angular momentum theory: eigenvalues and eigenvectors, spherical harmonics, rotations and spin, additions theorems and their applications.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 612 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 602 Advanced Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)

    The following applications are examined: non-relativistic theory - systems of identical particles, second quantization, Hartree-Fock theory, as well as path integral formulation of quantum mechanics; relativistic theory: Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations, positron theory, propogator theory and their applications; field quantization, radiative effects, Dirac and Majorana spinors, Noether’s theorem.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 613 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 603 High Energy Physics (3 credits)

    This course discusses symmetries and groups; antiparticles; electrodynamics of spinless particles, the Dirac equation and its implications for the electrodynamics of spin 1/2 particles. A general discussion of loops, renormalization and running coupling constants, hadronic structure and partons, is used to introduce the principles of Quantum Chromodynamics and Electroweak Interactions. The course concludes with an exposition of gauge symmetries, the Weinberg-Salam model, and Grand Unification.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 616 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 609 Selected Topics in Quantum or High Energy Physics (3 credits)

    This course reflects the research interests of the physics faculty in quantum or high energy physics and/or those of the graduate students working with them.
    Note: Students who have taken the same topic under PHYS 615, PHYS 618 or PHYS 619 may not take this course for credit. 09-10

    Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (630-639)


    PHYS 636 Condensed Matter Physics I (3 credits)

    Review of electron levels in periodic potentials, various band-structure methods, Thomas-Fermi and Hartree-Fock theories, screening, anharmonic effects crystals, inhomogeneous semiconductors, p-n junctions, transistors. Dielectric properties of insulators, ferroelectric materials. Defects in crystals. Magnetic ordering, paramagnetism, diamagnetism, ferromagnetism, phase transitions, superconductivity.

    PHYS 637 Condensed Matter Physics II (3 credits)

    Dielectrics and ferroelectrics; diamagnetism and paramagnetism; ferro-magnetism and antiferromagnetism; magnetic resonance; optical phenomena in insulators; superconductivity.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 633 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 639 Selected Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (3 credits)

    This course reflects the research interests of the physics faculty in condensed matter physics and/or those of the graduate students working with them.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 635 may not take this course for credit.

    Topics in Theoretical Physics (640-649)

    PHYS 642 Statistical Physics (3 credits)

    This course covers statistical concepts, probability, Gaussian probability distribution, statistical ensemble, macrostates and microstates, thermodynamic probability, statistical thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, entropy, thermodynamic laws and statistical relations, partition functions, Maxwell’s distribution, phase transformation, Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, quantum statistics in the classical limit, black-body radiation, conduction electrons in metals, interacting particle system, lattice vibrations, virial coefficients, Weiss molecular field approximation.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 654 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 644 Advanced Classical Mechanics and Relativity (3 credits)

    This course covers generalized coordinates, Lagrange’s equations, method of Lagrange multipliers, variational formulation, Hamilton’s equations of motion, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, special theory of relativity, Einstein’s axioms, Lorentz transformations, form invariance and tensors, four-vectors, gravity.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 658 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 646 Electrodynamics (3 credits)

    This course covers the electrostatic boundary-value problem with Green’s function, Maxwell’s equations, energy-momentum tensor, guided waves, dielectric wave-guides, fibre optics, radiation static field, multipole radiation, velocity and acceleration field, Larmor’s formula, relativistic generalization, radiating systems, linear antenna, aperture in wave guide, scattering, Thompson scattering, Bremsstrahlung, Abraham-Lorentz equation, Breit-Wigner formula, Green’s function for Helmholtz’s equation. Noether’s theorem.

    PHYS 648 Non Linear Waves

    Linear stability analysis and limitations, modulated waves and nonlinear dispersion relations, Korteweg-de Vries, sine-Gordon, and nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Hydro-dynamic, transmission-line, mechanical, lattice, and optical solitions. Applications in optical fibres, Josephson junction arrays. Inverse scattering method, conservation laws.

    PHYS 649 Selected Topics in Theoretical Physics (3 credits)

    This course reflects the research interests of the Physics faculty in theoretical physics and/or those of the graduate students working with them.

    Topics in Applied Physics (670 - 679)

    PHYS 676 Physics of Acoustic Devices (3 credits)

    The course contents include the following: sound wave propagation, stress, strain wave impedance, bulk modes; piezoelectric transducers, isotropic media, bulk modes, transmission and reflection, surface waves, acoustic waveguides; finite sources, piston transducer, diffraction, transient sources, pulsed excitations; focused transducers, scanned acoustic microscope; acoustic imaging, A, B, and C scans, phased arrays, scanning laser acoustic microscope; reflection and scattering of acoustic waves, acoustic devices, resonators, filters, charge transfer devices, acousto-optic devices; piezoelectric sensing devices, bulk, surface, plate and fibre modes; introduction to chemosensory and biosensors, molecular and pattern recognition, optical sensors, examples of practical devices.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 675 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 677 Digital Electronics (3 credits)

    This course explores the basic electronic components which make up modern laboratory apparatus including microcomputers. The course includes experimental studies of various small-, medium-, and large-scale integrated circuits (SSI, MSI & LSI circuits) including digital-to-analogue and analogue-to-digital converters (Daces and ADCs). A circuit is designed, bread-boarded and tested to perform a common laboratory or computer-related function, such as EPROM programming.
    Note: Students who have received credit for PHYS 673 may not take this course for credit.

    PHYS 679 Selected Topics in Applied Physics (3 credits)

    This course reflects the research interests of the Physics faculty in Applied Physics and/or those of the graduate students working with them.
    Seminar, Report, Thesis, and Comprehensive Examination

    PHYS 760 MSc Seminar on Selected Topics (3 credits)

    Students must given one seminar in the field of their research. In addition, full time students must participate in all seminars given in the department, and part time students must attend, during their studies, the same number of seminars that are normally given during the minimum residence requirement for full time students. The course in evaluated on a pass/fail basis. No substitution is permitted.

    PHYS 780 Report on Specific Subject (18 credits)

    PHYS 790 Master’s Research and Thesis (30 credits)

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