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Bachelor of Applied Technology - Integrated Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

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  • Practical experience
    The IAMT program combines up-to-date theory with practical hands-on training and real world experience. There is a co-op component option.
  • Entry requirements
    It is geared to motivated individuals looking for challenging careers in the dynamic and growing advanced manufacturing industry.
  • Academic Title
    Bachelor of Applied Technology - Integrated Advanced Manufacturing Technologies
  • Course description
    Level One
    CHEM1100     Chemistry
    Description: This course will increase the student`s knowledge of chemistry as it applies to engineering. It will include general topics such as the chemical laws, atoms, molecules, stoichiometry, types of chemical reactions, thermochemistry, bonding, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility, polarity, organic chemistry, corrosion, flow and diffusion and biomechanics.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    DRWG1010     Engineering Drawing Principles 1
    Description: Graphic communication through Engineering Drawing is a critically important part of all manufacturing technologies. Free-hand engineering sketching techniques, as well as industry standard 2-Dimensional CAD software are used. The course includes isometric sketching and drawing, single- and multi-view orthographic drawing and projection, and dimensioning and tolerancing, applied to mechanical, electrical, electronic, and fluid power drawings.
    Hours: 65
    Credits: 4

    FND1060     Foundation Module (Advanced Manufacturing)
    Description: This course will prepare the students with the basic laws of calculus and the basic laws of physics. The calculus covered includes derivatives of all the basic functions including exponential, polynomials and trigonometric functions. Factoring of higher order polynomials and evaluating limits are also covered. The physics covered includes: kinematics, Newton’s first, second and third laws, work and energy, conservation of momentum, centripetal acceleration as well as the basic laws of magnetism and electricity. In addition, there is a project component, which allows the students to apply both the math and physics components though a project study, from both field work and research conducted on the internet. The students are also given an opportunity to visit an industrial company(ies) on a site visit.
    Hours: 85
    Credits: 6

    LIBS7150     Personal Awareness and Group Dynamics
    Description: Self-awareness, interpersonal communication and team work are essential elements in both work and social settings. An experiential approach ? learning by doing - assists the participant to become an effective individual and group member. Individual and team activities will enhance participants’ skills to work with a variety of personalities in diverse situations.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MACH1500     Material Removal Manufacturing Processes - A
    Description: Almost everything we need in our lives has to be first manufactured " cars, television sets, furniture, clothing. Manufacturing is the enterprise through which materials are converted into products. In this course the students will focus on material removal processes such as conventional and CNC machining, abrasive processes, and nontraditional machining processes. The course topics will include theory of chip formation and related dynamic and thermal balances, principles of turning, milling, drilling and grinding, electrochemical and thermal energy machining processes, and fundamentals of CNC operations.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    MATH1560     Calculus for Engineering
    Description: Calculus is a powerful tool for analyzing mathematical functions. This course will begin with a review of common algebraic and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Limits, continuity, and derivatives, with their applications, such as tangent lines, extreme values, and linear approximations, will be covered. Integral calculus will include fundamental theorems, inegral as area, indefinite and definite integrals, transcendental functions, and methods of integration. Engineering applications, such as areas, volume, arc length, work ,and energy, will be presented.
    Hours: 65
    Credits: 4

    MATR1040     Materials Science and Engineering - A
    Description: This is the first module in Materials Science and Engineering and is followed by Materials Science and Engineering B. This course will evaluate five categories of materials available to engineers " metals, ceramics and glasses, polymers, composites and semiconductors. The course will include topics from the fundamentals of materials science such as atomic bonding, crystalline structures, diffusion, phase diagrams, and mechanical and thermal behavior; a study of structural properties of all five categories of engineering materials, as well as their electrical optical and magnetic behavior; and the criteria for selection of engineering materials for a variety of applications.
    Hours: 26
    Credits: 2

    MECH1140     Year 1 Project - A
    Description: The first year project is a two semester project where students will apply different Course Learning Outcomes from first year engineering courses. Working in team, students must reverse-engineer certain mechanical and electrical components of a Robotic Arm. As well, each group must design and implement new mechanical and electrical components thereby making the final Robotic Arm a unique design. In the first project course, students are to reverse-engineer, to design and to manufacture different mechanical and certain electrical components of the Robotic Arm.
    Hours: 15
    Credits: 1

    PHYS1010     Physics
    Description: This course presents the following topics of physics: electricity, magnetism, and optics. Students will become more familiar with subjects such as electric charge, flux and potential, electric currents, resistance and capacitance, AC/DC circuits and instruments, magnetic fields and induction, electromagnetic waves, light waves and optical instruments.
    Hours: 52
    Credits: 4

    PHYS1150     Physics - Mechanical
    Description: This course will increase the student’s knowledge of physics as it applies to mechanical engineering. It will include general topics such as the nature of science, atomic theory, scientific units and accuracy of measurement, kinematics and kinetics, energy and momentum, fluids, harmonic motion, gases and thermodynamics. It may also include a study of selected advanced topics such as nanotechnology, energy sources, recycling, refining of metals and nuclear physics.
    Hours: 52
    Credits: 4

    Level Two
    BUS1260     Business Fundamentals
    Description: This course will provide a starting point to understanding the functions of business and the role of engineers and engineering managers in the business environment. Economic systems and forms of business organization will be evaluated. The major functions of business (e.g. management, human resources, engineering, production, marketing and finance) will be examined in the Canadian environment and compared to the international environment. Special focus will be placed upon manufacturing-based businesses.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    CDEV1020     Co-op and Career Preparation
    Description: This mandatory course prepares students for job searching for their co-op work terms and for post-graduate careers. Students will learn to critically evaluate their skills, attitudes, and expectations and evaluate and interpret available opportunities in the workplace. Self-marketing techniques using resumes, cover letters, cold-calls, and interviewing will be learned and students will learn the expectations, rules, and regulations that apply in the workplace with regards to social, organizational, ethical, and safety issues.
    Hours: 16
    Credits: 1

    COMM1165     Style in Scientific & Technical Writing
    Description: This course is the first of two communications courses designed for students in the applied technical degree programs. It will focus on short forms of technical communication. Course work includes workplace correspondence, technical instructions and descriptions, short report, and basic research. Through application and practice, students will develop analytical skills, critical thinking, and problem solving. Students will also plan and deliver an oral presentation.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    DRWG1020     Engineering Drawing Principles II
    Description: SolidWorks 2008 CAD software interface and fundamental commands. 2D sketching tools. Geometrical and dimensional sketch constraints. Produce 3D models for parts and assemblies. Creation of fully annotated drawings. Weldment and sheet metal modeling and drawings.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: DRWG1010

    ELCN1020     Electrical & Electronic Foundations
    Description: All system designers need to understand electrical principles and the control systems that use them. This course covers fundamental electrical principles, electrical and electronic components, as well as electrical and electronic circuits and their application to manufacturing process. Control system devices are then covered, from switches and relays, through analog devices such as amplifiers and signal conditioners, to digital devices for applications such as timing, counting, arithmetic, circuit switching, and data storage.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: PHYS1010

    IFME1235     Fluid Power and Mechanics
    Description: Fluid power systems figure prominently in industry as sources of energy for prime movers. Students will study fluid power principles and their application in industrial pneumatic and hydraulic systems. Students will explore theoretical concepts as well as industry-standard components and solutions to fluid power problems.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: PHYS1150

    LIBS7080     Generic Skills
    Description: In this course students will produce a group project that will integrate the essential employability skills learned in their program to date. They will apply advanced communications skills, critical and creative thinking skills, problem solving skills and personal and interpersonal skills to specified projects. The primary focus is to employ essential employability skills in ways pertinent to job-related tasks and to life-long learning.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2

    MACH1510     Material Removal Manufacturing Processes - B
    Description: Programming NC machines using G codes. Programming using EdgeCAM. Trigonometric calculations. Angular and radial programming. Feed, speed calculation. Data extraction. Non-traditional metal removal processes. Sources for research. CNC machining of project parts. Solid model geometry creation.
    Hours: 15
    Credits: 1
    Pre-Requisites: MACH1500

    MATR1050     Materials Science and Engineering - B
    Description: Equilibrium phase diagrams, non-equilibrium behaviour, heat treatment of metals, diffusion, strengthening processes. Microstructure and properties of polymers, ceramics and composite materials. Electrical, magnetic and optical properties.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: MATR1040

    MECH1150     Year 1 Project - B
    Description: To demonstrate successful mastery of selected Course Learning Outcomes: analysis of electrical and mechanical systems, project management and documentation.
    Hours: 15
    Credits: 1
    Pre-Requisites: MECH1140

    MECH1190     Engineering Mechanics I
    Description: This is the first module in Engineering Mechanics. It is comprised of Engineering Mechanics A " Statics and is followed by Engineering Mechanics B " Dynamics. Because Engineering Mechanics is a study of forces acting on structures and their members, it is the origin for all engineering calculations in areas such as stress analysis, machine design, hydraulics and structural design. Engineering Mechanics is classified into Statistics " the study of forces and their effects on stationary systems; Kinematics " the study of the motion of a body without considering the forces that cause the motion; and Kinetics " the study of forces causing the motion of bodies. The course will examine the conditions for static equilibrium of two- and three-dimensional systems, effects of frictional forces, moments of inertia, equations of rectilinear, angular and plane motions, linear and angular inertia, conservation of energy in plane motions, and linear and angular impulse and momentum.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: PHYS1150

    Level Three

    COOP1040     Co-op Work Term I (IAMT)
    Description: This course will provide students with approved engineering-related work experience. The goal of this work term is for students to gain a fundamental appreciation of relevant product and process design principles and techniques, including the understanding of design specifications, functional requirements, decision theory, and cost effectiveness. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the students are able to apply relevant principles of mathematics, physics, and engineering science to the solution of basic design, manufacturing and automation challenges in industrial settings. Generic skills they have studied up to this point include the understanding of teamwork skills and individual accountability, conflict resolution techniques and effective verbal and written communication.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Four

    CNTR2120     Programmable Logic Controllers - A
    Description: PLC's are used to control most industrial processes. Students will program and configure PLC's to control automated systems. Proprietary PLC systems as well as the IEC 61131-3 system will be studied. Ladder Logic and other languages will be used for simple Boolean logic programs through to structured programs with function calls and interrupts. Students will be able to configure individual PLC and systems of multiple PLC's in local area networks.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: ELCN1020
    CoRequisites: MECH2160

    CNTR2150     Sensors, Actuators and Interfaces - A
    Description: Computers must sense and change conditions in controlled systems. This course surveys a wide range of common sensors and actuators. Signal conditioning for interfacing is discussed. Various set-up and configuration requirements for smart peripheral are also discussed.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: ELCN1020
    CoRequisites: MECH2160

    LIBS7040     Science, Technology and Society
    Description: This theme-based course aims to provide an understanding of the historical, social, economic and political context within which scientific and technological advancement takes place. Innovation is a social product, often an expression of current ideology or a response to a social need. Conversely technological and scientific innovation can transform the structure of society, its value system, and institutions. Through a series of lectures and student-centered activities, this course will assess the impact, the benefits, consequences and implications of the inter-relationship between society and science and technology.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    MANU2040     Forming Manufacturing Processes - A
    Description: This is the first course module in Forming Manufacturing Processes and it is followed by Forming Manufacturing Processes B. Forming Manufacturing is the second course in a series of process design related courses. The students will study non-machining manufacturing processes and techniques through which consumer goods and industrial products are created. The course topics will include fundamentals of metal casting, metal forming and shaping such as rolling, forging, extrusion, wire and bar drawing, sheet metal working, powder metallurgy, and forming and shaping of plastics, ceramics, glasses and composite materials. The students will also gain a solid knowledge of welding, brazing, soldering and adhesive bonding processes, as well as surface treatment processes, rapid prototyping, and microfabrication technologies.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: MACH1510, MATR1050

    MATH1575     Advanced Calculus
    Description: This course starts with conic sections, parameterized curves, and vectors in the plane and in space. Vector-valued functions and space curves are covered. Integration in vector fields, including Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem, is introduced with various applications. Multivariable functions, partial derivatives, Lagrange multipliers, Gradient vectors, and multiple integrals are evaluated. First and second order linear ordinary differential equations are investigated extensively. Power Series, Taylor and Maclaurin Series, and Fourier Series are presented.
    Hours: 75
    Credits: 5
    Pre-Requisites: MATH1560

    MATR1020     Strength of Materials I
    Description: It is essential that any product, machine or structure be safe and stable under the loads exerted on it during any foreseeable use. The analysis and design of such devices or structures to ensure safety is the primary objective of this course. The course will examine basic concepts in strength of materials, axial deformation, thermal stresses, torsional shear stresses and deformation, shearing forces and bending moments in beams, bending stresses, deflection of beams, analysis of columns and buckling phenomena, effects of combined stresses, and design of pressure vessels. Students will also learn about computer assisted structural analysis involving the finite element methods and their application in solid mechanics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: MECH1190
    CoRequisites: MECH2160

    MECH2130     Engineering Mechanics II
    Description: This is the second module in Engineering Mechanics. It is comprised of Engineering Mechanics B " Dynamics and is preceded by Engineering Mechanics A " Statics. Because Engineering Mechanics is a study of forces acting on structures and their members, it is the origin for all engineering calculations in areas such as stress analysis, machine design, hydraulics and structural design. Engineering Mechanics is classified into Statistics " the study of forces and their effects on stationary systems; Kinematics " the study of the motion of a body without considering the forces that cause the motion; and Kinetics " the study of forces causing the motion of bodies. The course will examine the conditions for static equilibrium of two- and three-dimensional systems, effects of frictional forces, moments of inertia, equations of rectilinear, angular and plane motions, linear and angular inertia, conservation of energy in plane motions, and linear and angular impulse and momentum.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: MATH1560, MECH1190, PHYS1150
    CoRequisites: MECH2160

    MECH2160     Year 2 Project - A
    Description: The second year project is a two semester project, which is an automated work cell that contains a pick and place robot, a parts feeder, and an interface to a forming press. In Year 2 Project A, each group of 2 or 3 students will design and build the robot and feeder with college-supplied parts and materials. Lubrication and beam deflection studies will be fulfilled as well.
    Hours: 15
    Credits: 1
    Pre-Requisites: MECH1150
    CoRequisites: CNTR2120, CNTR2150, MATR1020, MECH2130, PROG2280

    MGMT2120     Project Management, Methods & Tools
    Description: Management of large scale projects is both a science and art. Engineering projects are typically complex, are comprised of many tasks/components and involve a cross-section of different functional teams. In industry, one of the biggest challenges is to ensure product development or implementation is on time and within the original project parameters. One key success factor for managers is to be able to organize, lead and manage multiple tasks simultaneously. This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the structure, functions and operations of projects. A significant emphasis will be on problem solving and teamwork skills while also providing practical training on the software tools and project planning processes/techniques. Key topics include goal setting, identifying dependency relationships, outlining resources required, concurrent activity management, decision theory, monitoring and controlling of progress to result in the successful completion of projects. Overall, this course helps prepare students how best to work as a productive member of a team.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    PROG2280     Programming Fundamentals - A
    Description: Programming is the basis of most computer data management and automated machine control. Students will master software design techniques appropriate for structured programming including top-down design, modularity and testing. Students will apply standard programming principles (sequencing, decision-making, repetition, and structured code) to data management for the creation of reliable, robust and maintainable code, principles that can then be extended to control programming.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: MECH1150

    Level Five

    CNTR2100     Microprocessors and Embedded Systems
    Description: Microprocessor system architecture, peripherals, parallel, serial, and analog interfaces. Data transfer and synchronization; interfacing to sensors and actuators; system exceptions, and interrupt techniques. Assembly language and C language programming, testing, and debugging for microcontrollers.
    Hours: 75
    Credits: 5
    Pre-Requisites: ELCN1020

    CNTR2140     Programmable Logic Controllers - B
    Description: Advanced instructions involve file manipulations, file arithmetic and logic, shifting register functions, FIFO, LIFO, and sequencers. Intelligent I/O modules for analog devices. The IEC 1131-3 programming structure and data types, and different programming languages, including FBD, SFC, and ST. A major project involves configuration and programming of a modular PLC system.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: CNTR2120
    CoRequisites:
    CNTR2160     Sensors, Actuators and Interfaces - B
    Description: Combinational and sequential logic, and A/D and D/A data acquisition techniques. Noise reduction and signal isolation methods. Continuous sensors and actuators. A major .his is a continuation oflersrs, ration, and pressure measurementsproject involves: electrical design, selection of sensors and actuators, and testing of the electrical system.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: CNTR2150

    COMM1170     Technical Communications and Visual Media
    Description: This is the second technical communications course designed for students in the applied technical degree programs. It will focus on reports, web pages, and other visual documents, and will build on skills developed in the first course. Students will design and produce digital presentations, analyze complex technical documents for style, content, and visual effectiveness. They will also create user manuals, publishable articles, and analytical reports. Further topics may include: lab reports, project reports, perception and attention, and collaboration.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: COMM1160 or COMM1165 or COMM1350

    DSGN3100     Analysis and Design of Mechanisms
    Description: The heart of any machine is a mechanism. It consists of a number of connected parts which provide the desired displacements, velocities, accelerations and forces to do the work for which the machine is designed. In analyzing and designing mechanisms the students will cover topics including classification of mechanisms, position, velocity and acceleration analyses of mechanisms, synthesis of linkages and cams, the basic principles of static and dynamic force analysis of mechanisms, static and dynamic balancing of rigid rotors and vibration analysis of single-mass systems.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: MECH2130

    MANU2050     Forming Manufacturing Processes - B
    Description: Manufacturing processes of non-metals including casting and forming of polymers, rapid prototyping, ceramics, composite materials. Surface engineering. Processing of electronics: silicon wafers, IC, PCB. Assessment and justification of competitive processes for manufacture.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: MANU2040

    MATR2050     Strength of Materials II
    Description: Beams in elastic bending. Buckling of columns. Thin-walled pressure vessel. Combined stresses: stress and strain transformations, principal stresses and principal strains. Failure criteria: maximum normal stress, maximum shear stress and maximum distortion energy theories. Virtual work analysis of pinned jointed truss.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: MATR1020

    MECH2170     Year 2 Project - B
    Description: This is a continuation of Year 2 Project A. Each student group will design an operator panel, mount the electrical components, and wire the cell, including a modular PLC system, sensors, actuators, and etc. Then, each group will program the PLC for automatic and stepping operations, and program the PC for HMI communications to the PLC. The pick-n-place robot mechanism will be analyzed. The entire project will be documented in the end, and a project report will be prepared by each individual student.
    Hours: 15
    Credits: 1
    Pre-Requisites: MECH2160

    PROG2310     Programming Fundamentals - B
    Description: This second programming course emphasizes: problem-solving skills, structured programming, algorithms for database applications and scientific computations, and human-machine interface software.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: PROG2280

    ROBO1020     Robotics Fundamentals I
    Description: Robots are common place in automated manufacturing today. Students will study robot structure and kinematics of robotic arm and will learn to recognize the advantages of various types of manipulators. Students will learn different types of robotic end-effectors including main kinds of grippers and their design.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: IFME1235

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours
    Level Six
    COOP2020     Co-op Work Term II (IAMT)
    Description: This course will provide students with approved engineering-related work experience. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the students are able to apply design assessment and refinement techniques including concurrent engineering to optimize product and process development flows. They have an appreciation of the best business practices. They have the ability to think critically and creatively and appreciate the dynamic economic forces shaping the modern world.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Seven
    COOP3030     Co-op Work Term III (IAMT)
    Description: This course will provide students with college-approved work experience in advanced manufacturing environments. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the students are able to creatively solve more demanding engineering problems encountered in product design, process design, and process control using sophisticated analytical engineering tools. They have an appreciation for business organizations and their operations, project management techniques, financial management, and they know how to make effective presentations using a multimedia approach. They have also learned how to understand, value and respect cultural diversity in a global, societal, economical, and environmental context.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Eight
    CNTR3010     Servo Control and Fuzzy Logic
    Description: Servo-control techniques range from On-Off control to Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control, and Fuzzy Logic. The application of these control algorithms is covered, as are as systems response characteristics and implications of error signal shapes. Students will build servo-control circuits, and will program and tune modern servo-controller based systems.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: CNTR2140, CNTR2160, MATH1575
    CoRequisites: MECH3250

    DSGN3040     Design of Machine Elements
    Description: The design of both industrial equipment and consumer goods can require a detailed understanding of machine design fundamentals. The design of a range of machine elements are studied in detail, including gears and gear drives, chain and belt drives, shafts, bearings, power screws, clutches and brakes, springs, and machine frames. Detailed force and stress analysis will be performed, along with the creation of engineering drawings and 3-D solid models of typical components.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: DRWG1020, MATR2050
    CoRequisites: MECH3250

    FIN2080     Financial Management
    Description: Today’s technology employees need financial management skills to make decisions and manage projects within an organization. This introductory course for non-accounting students covers aspects of both financial accounting and management accounting. Students will be able to apply concepts of financial accounting to both personal and business situations, including the preparation and use of basic financial statements. Management accounting topics will allow the students to understand cost behaviour and its use in decision-making, evaluate capital investments, and prepare operating budgets.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MANU3000     Industrial Engineering
    Description: Industrial engineering problem solving charting techniques, industrial safety issues within the enterprise, machine safety, standard time calculations, operator allowances, advanced project planning techniques, work sampling, wage payment plans and labour relations. Effects of statistical fluctuation and dependant events on production, line balancing and standard time development.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MANU3080     Computer Integrated Manufacturing - A
    Description: This course will focus on strategies for the successful implementation of CIM technologies throughout the manufacturing enterprise. Traditional production strategies and new methods such as Just-In-Time (JIT) and Lean Manufacturing will be studied. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) techniques for inventory and production planning and monitoring, and planning of suitable electronic data interchange will be discussed. Students will select appropriate CIM technologies for various sizes of manufacturing companies, and will prepare budgets and implementation plans.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: ROBO1020

    MATH3205     Numerical Methods And Linear Algebra
    Description: With the ever increased computational capability and the widespread availability of personal computers, numerical methods have become an invaluable tool for engineers to model, to analyze and to solve complex engineering problems. To be successful, the users must have in-depth knowledge of the numerical methods’ formulation, the influences of errors and approximations and the capability of different competing numerical formulations. To meet these challenges, this course will provide the students with understandings of the effects of errors and approximations on numerical results, the applied knowledge of solving equations numerically and techniques of curve fitting, data modeling, numerical differentiation and numerical integration as tools to solve engineering problems. Since numerical methods are computational intensive, time will also be spent to cover related subject areas such as matrix algebra, determinant, eigenvalue and eigenvectors.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    MECH3250     Year 3 Project - A
    Description: Four to five students will design or receive from a third party customer, a product for automated manufacturing and / or assembly. The entire automated system for building the product will also be designed. The larger groups will require formal delineation of duties and responsibilities. Assembly and detail drawings will be a main form of manufacturing communication and will be of industrial quality containing all required information. Process design will include mechanical drawings, material flow plans and project management tools. Certain mechanical analysis studies will be required for design validation.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: MECH2170
    CoRequisites: CNTR3010, DSGN3040

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

    Level Nine
    CNTR3020     Electrical Machines and Motion Control
    Description: Topics covered in this course include: single and three-phase AC systems; transformers, equivalent circuit, equations, efficiency and voltage regulation; DC motors, efficiency, operational characteristics and speed control; induction motors, equivalent circuit, efficiency and speed control; synchronous motors, phasor diagrams, speed control; power electronics; chopper and phase-controlled DC drives; and V/Hz control of AC motors.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: ELCN1020

    CNTR3130     Distributed Control Systems and Communications
    Description: Modern manufacturing plants consist of diverse types of controllers and intelligent peripherals, interconnected for monitoring and controlling automated systems distributed over large areas. This course teaches students how to interconnect, configure, and program control systems that require sharing of manufacturing data. Students will set up networks containing technologies from simple remote input/output level to Industrial Ethernet and Foundation Fieldbus level. Students will learn about OSI Physical and Application layer services for production control and for enterprise management.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    DSGN3020     Advanced Mechanical Design I
    Description: Topics in this course include: power screws analysis; preloaded fasteners in tension under static and cyclic loading; fillet welds analysis; design of helical compression ? extension, torsion and Belleville springs under static and dynamic loading; surface failure concepts and design parameters for surface fatigue.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN1040 or DSGN3040

    DSGN3030     Design for Manufacturing and Assembly
    Description: The efficient manufacture and assembly of components to form entire products is more important now than ever before, particularly in large volume production. Small errors can accumulate and generate major losses for a manufacturer. Selection of the assembly operation: manual, robotic or automated is determined by a number of factors, but most significant is how effectively each component is designed for ease of assembly. This course covers identification of different manufacturing processes and their comparative capabilities of dimensional and geometric tolerances as well as surface finish. Students will learn to select the proper assembly method, as well as how to evaluate and optimize a product design using Boothroyd-Dewhurst methods.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN3040

    MECH3260     Year 3 Project - B
    Description: Continuing from MECH3250 course, student groups will work on the final stages for the AMC build. During this project course, students manufacture all designed mechanical components within college facilities and / or will set-up the process with third party suppliers. Design of all system controls at workstation level and integration with the mechanical assembly of the entire system. Proof that the original conceptual design will actually work is achieved by the final demonstration. Interaction between independent groups working on subsections of a single system provides valuable insight into how industrial projects are completed. A comprehensive project documentation report is also required at the end of the course.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: MECH3250

    QUAL4010     Quality Assurance: Methods and Management - A
    Description: Methods and the management principles used in Quality Assurance. Total Quality (TQ), continuous improvement, industry standards and procedures.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites:
    CoRequisites:
    ROBO3061     Robotics Fundamentals II
    Description: Robots are common place in automated manufacturing today. Students will study robot structure and operation and will learn to recognize the advantages of various types of robots and robotic technology. Students will apply robots to specific tasks, integrate robots into automated workcells and program robots to perform typical industrial operations. Safety and organizational issues will be considered along with financial and justification issues.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ROBO1020

    Level Ten
    COOP4010     Co-op Work Term IV (IAMT)
    Description: This course will provide students with college-approved work experience in advanced manufacturing environments. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the students are able to creatively solve more demanding engineering problems encountered in product design, process design, and process control using sophisticated analytical engineering tools. They have an appreciation for business organizations and their operations, project management techniques, financial management, and they know how to make effective presentations using a multimedia approach. They have also learned how to understand, value and respect cultural diversity in a global, societal, economical, and environmental context. These skill areas will be improved during the work term while the student responsibly performs the duties as defined in the job description, in accordance with course and program outcomes.

    Student development will be evaluated during and at the conclusion of the work experience. The student’s written communication skills are evaluated after the work experience through the submission of an essay.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Eleven
    DSGN4040     Advanced Mechanical Design II
    Description: This course will complete topics from DSGN3020 (Advanced Mechanical Design 1) by examining the finite-element method (FEM) and its application to problems in solid mechanics. Before introducing the method, a brief review will be made of stress, strains and displacements of solid bodies due to combined loadings. This review will also include transformation of stress, principal stresses and the maximum distortion energy criterion (von Mises criterion). The mathematical foundations of the FEM will then be introduced with reference to one dimensional linear elements. Next, the analysis of single parts and simple assemblies will be carried out using the Finite-Element Analysis software COSMOSWorks (SolidWorks add in) with an emphasis on model verification and correct interpretation of the graphical and numerical results.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN3040

    ECON3010     Engineering Economics
    Description: Engineering Economics is a requirement of the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board. Marketing and price determination. Project cash flows. Assessment of alternative investments/equipment/projects and determination of output decisions. Depreciation of equipment. Factors affecting decisions: Taxation, Inflation. Assessment and management of uncertainties and risk.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: FIN2080

    LIBS7060     Law, Ethics and Professional Practice
    Description: In this course students will study the role of law in society, the Canadian legal system, law of torts, contract law, protection of intellectual property, forms of business organizations such as sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations, foundations of ethical reasoning, engineering Codes of Ethics, professional engineering Acts, ethical dilemmas encountered in the engineering profession, ethical issues related to the protection of the environment, risks associated with engineering activities, protection of public interests, regulation of the engineering profession in Canada, and disciplinary powers delegated by the governments to engineering associations.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MANU3090     Computer Integrated Manufacturing - B
    Description: The objectives of this course are to explore some new technologies involved in Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) systems. Topics include: group technology and flexible manufacturing, manufacturing planning and control, quality control, lean production and agile manufacturing. Practical works include the development of an integrated environment using specialized software package.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: MANU3080

    MANU4010     Advanced Manufacturing Practices & Processes - A
    Description: Modern manufacturing is an exciting combination of new manufacturing techniques and machines, computers, microelectronics and sophisticated organizational methods applied to manufacturing practices and processes. The students will quickly discover that advanced manufacturing technologies help manufacturers meet the productivity, quality and cost reduction demands of competitive global markets. The course topics covered in this first module will include the principles of agile manufacturing, application of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and concurrent engineering.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: MANU3000

    MATH3020     Mathematical Modelling and Applied Statistics
    Description: Predicting the behaviour of complex systems requires valid mathematical models and data derived from real sampled behaviour. This course explores theories for mathematically modeling engineering systems including linear and nonlinear systems involving stresses, fluid flow and heat transfer. The accompanying study of applied statistics includes probability distributions, reliability, queuing theory, testing, sampling and simulations, and computer performance analysis.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4
    Pre-Requisites: MATH3200, MATH3205

    MECH4100     Advanced Technical Elective I
    Description: On an individual basis and through self-directed learning, students will select an area of specialized study involving engineering analysis, design, development and research. The area of study may be in product design, process design or process control. It may include a new design, design improvement/refinement or applied research. The study will be under the supervision of a faculty or industry mentor and may include industry-based projects or applied research with a multi-disciplinary approach.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    CoRequisites: MECH4260
    MECH4260     Year 4 Project - A
    Description: This is a two part engineering capstone design project. Both parts of the course must be completed within the same calendar year. Engineers are required to manage projects, perform design analyses and select manufacturing processes. In this course, students will work in large teams to design an engineering product and the manufacturing and assembly processes to accompany it. The product will be supported by a business plan. Enterprise management will be incorporated in the manufacturing design. In the first semester, students will build their teams and plan out the project and complete a technical proposal including a preliminary design and manufacturing process selection and also a business proposal including market research, cost, timing and space and labour requirements. Following a concurrent design for manufacture and assembly procedure, students will pass through a design gate in preparation for the production analysis in the second semester.
    Hours: 75
    Credits: 5
    Pre-Requisites: MECH3260
    CoRequisites: MECH4100
    OPER2110     Advanced Operations Management
    Description: The term operations management refers to the direction and control of the processes that transform inputs into finished goods and services. This function is essential to systems producing goods and services in both profit and non-profit organizations. The goal of the course is to help students become effective managers in today’s competitive, global environment. The course will examine operations as a competitive weapon, demand forecasting, supply-chain management, aggregate planning, inventory systems, just-in-time systems and material requirements planning.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    Level Twelve

    ENVR3010     Environment, Health and Ergonomics
    Description: Engineers have responsibilities for human health, for protection of the environment, and for the ethical issues associated with the risks of engineering activities in society. Engineers must also design the human-machine interfaces that allow optimum control of automated manufacturing systems. This course provides an understanding of human physiology and psychology as it relates to machine control and manufacturing processes, and provides an understanding of engineering codes and regulations that cover safety and environmental impact. Analytical methods will include cost/benefit analysis that include non-monetary issues, and risk management techniques.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: MANU3000

    MANU4020     Advanced Manufacturing Practices & Processes - B
    Description: Modern manufacturing is an exciting combination of new manufacturing techniques and machines, computers, microelectronics and sophisticated organizational methods applied to manufacturing practices and processes. The course topics covered in this second module will include enterprise resources planning, lean production, nanotechnology, distribution management, and manufacturing systems integration.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: MANU2050

    MECH3110     Thermodynamics
    Description: ?Heat? is one of the fundamental quantities upon which life and human existence are based, and utilization of heat energy ?fueled? the industrial revolution. Today, our understanding of the principles of Thermodynamics and energy conversion provides a powerful tool for design and modification of a range of heat-based systems. Systems to be analyzed in this course include heating and refrigeration systems, internal combustion engines, steam and gas turbines, as well as electrical power generation and transmission equipment.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: CHEM1100

    MECH4110     Advanced Technical Elective II
    Description: On an individual basis and through self-directed learning, students will select an area of specialized study involving engineering analysis, design, development and research. The area of study may be in product design, process design or process control. It may include a new design, a design improvement/refinement or applied research. The study will be under the supervision of a faculty or industry mentor and may include industrial based projects or applied research with a multi-disciplinary approach. The area of specialized study may continue work begun in Advanced Technical Elective I by suitability and significantly extending the original work or it may be a completely new area of study.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MECH4270     Year 4 Project - B
    Description: This is a two part engineering capstone design project. Both parts of the course must be completed within the same calendar year. Engineers are required to manage projects, perform design analyses and select manufacturing processes. In this course, students will work in large teams to design an engineering product and the manufacture and assembly processes to accompany it. The product will be supported by a business plan. Enterprise management will be incorporated in the manufacturing design. In the final semester, students will select the manufacturing and assembly processes and equipment, plan and simulate a manufacturing facility and perform a comparison of the final costs of operation and product with the original budgeted plan. Students will write a formal report containing all of their work and present the results in front of peers, faculty and industry members.
    Hours: 75
    Credits: 5
    Pre-Requisites: MECH4260

    MGMT4110     Human Resources Management
    Description: Using a variety of resources, this course examines a number of specific topics from the disciplines of Management (including Supervision) and Human Resources (including Career Management). Designed to meet the needs of technical professionals throughout the early part of their careers, this course focuses on the critical elements of these subject areas.

    Graduating students need to learn how to obtain suitable professional employment and how to successfully move up in their organization. Most technical professionals will, at a very early stage in their careers, acquire various management duties and be responsible for the supervision of others.

    In addition, both from a personal perspective and the perspective of a manager, technical professionals need to be aware of the workings of, and supports offered by, the corporate Human Resource Department. In fact, technical entrepreneurs may find that they are the Human Resource Department.

    Topics in Management and Human Resources provides a sound framework which will provide students with the knowledge and skills to succeed in these roles.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MGMT4120     Strategic Management
    Description: This is an integrative course which requires students to apply the principles and knowledge across all business disciplines (i.e. management, operations, marketing, and accounting) to evaluate situations and develop strategic responses. Using a resource based view of the firm, students will experience all phases of the strategic process including strategy formulation, strategy implementation and strategic control. Both external and internal contextual issues are discussed, allowing the student to develop an appreciation of the wide range of techniques and approaches which are currently in use. The course uses an interactive computer simulation and situational cases, plus in class exercises to enhance the student’s appreciation for the complexity of the strategy trade-offs which managers must face. Using the simulation, students will make decisions, measure their quantitative results and propose corrective actions or insights.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    QUAL4020     Quality Assurance: Methods and Management-B
    Description: Topics in this course include: analytical methods used in Quality Assurance; fundamental elements of modern methods for statistical quality control used by industry: concepts, principles, procedures, statistical tools, and computations used to analyze and maintain statistical control of manufacturing and production processes and systems; standard statistical methods; and the use of Excel to perform quality control related statistical calculations.
    Hours: 30
    Credits: 2
    Pre-Requisites: QUAL4010

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours
          

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