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Bachelor of Applied Technology - Architecture - Project and Facility Management

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  • Objectives
    Graduates of this program will be educated and trained specifically to supervise and manage projects and facilities for the built environment. Students will graduate with strong foundations in architecture, construction, basic engineering and business, comprehensive insight into facility management and exposure to both liberal arts disciplines and practical applications for the business enterprise. All dimensions will involve creativity, leadership training, teamwork, and individual initiative, emphasizing the practical application of classroom studies. This program also provides a solid foundation for further studies in the field of architecture, construction and management.
  • Practical experience
    APFM students have founded a student chapter of IFMA, the International Facility Management Association, which provides students with a unique opportunity to interact with industry professionals. There is a co-op component option.
  • Academic Title
    Bachelor of Applied Technology - Architecture - Project and Facility Management
  • Course description
    The specialty areas are:

    Facility Management - Architectural design with an emphasis on the functionality of the built environment by integrating aspects such as people, place, process and technology.

    Project Management - Architectural design with an emphasis on the managerial and economic aspects of construction projects, including the planning, organization, management and control of the process.

    Sustainable Design - Architectural design with an emphasis on developing innovative solutions that reduce the energy and resource impact on the natural environment while minimizing capital and life-cycle costs for building owners and operators.

    Adaptive Design
    - Architectural design with an emphasis on preserving heritage buildings and adapting existing buildings to new uses.

    Approximately 6 courses in years 3 and 4 will be chosen from the technical elective specialty areas. At least 4 courses are required to be from one specialty area. Common core courses in project management, facility management and architectural design will be offered across all majors.

    Level One
    ARCH1120     Construction Materials and Methods I
    Description: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of building construction systems, in terms of connection between materiality and conceptual design, technical aspects of making and designing buildings, climate, solar geometry, and building science. It explores the connection of materials to methods through an analysis of the technical aspects of designing and constructing buildings and spaces. The relationship of building to context will be introduced through a primer on building science. Case studies of small scale buildings, together with the projects of Studio I, will be utilized to demonstrate the principles introduced within this course. The students will also be required to keep a detailed sketch book.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    ARCH2010     Building Sciences
    Description: Through this course, the student will be introduced to the concept of the building as a living entity. The variety of systems within a building will be examined in relation to the problems which can result when these systems are poorly designed or do not function as intended. Physical factors that influence good design for performance, durability, health efficiency and sustainability of buildings will be studied. Common building design/construction problems that result in poor performance, expensive repairs, litigation, etc., their causes and solutions will be explored through studies famous, infamous and vernacular buildings, materials, details, etc. The principles of building science will be utilized to establish the appropriate performance characteristics of the systems as well as the preventative/corrective actions which could be prescribed when things go wrong.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    CDEV1020     Co-op and Career Preparation
    Description: This mandatory course prepares students for job searching for their co-op work terms and for post-graduate careers. Students will learn to critically evaluate their skills, attitudes, and expectations and evaluate and interpret available opportunities in the workplace. Self-marketing techniques using resumes, cover letters, cold-calls, and interviewing will be learned and students will learn the expectations, rules, and regulations that apply in the workplace with regards to social, organizational, ethical, and safety issues.
    Hours: 16
    Credits: 1

    COMM1650     Styles in Scientific and Technical Writing
    Description: Integrated with the technical programs, this course will focus on short, introductory forms of technical communication. Course assignments include, but are not limited to, letters, memos, in-time writings such as journals and logs, basic research and documentation, short technical writings, and beginning presentation skills. Students will also develop analytical skills, critical thinking, collaborative writing skills, and problem solving through assigned work.
    Hours: 60
    Credits: 4

    COMP1180     Computer Concepts I
    Description: This course concentrates on the advanced application of word processing, spreadsheets, presentation and CAD software in order to accomplish industry specific tasks, such as estimating, data management, report/proposal preparation, and drawings. The use of the computer to prepare professional presentations will also be explored and applied to the project work within studio I
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    DSGN1050     Studio I
    Description: This is the first in a series of eight courses that provides the opportunity to integrate, apply and build upon the knowledge and skills acquired during course work to projects. The focus of Studio I is on the design process and the methodical approach that can be utilized to develop a building or space. The course includes study of the principles of colour, texture, form, rhythm and harmony as applied to the built environment. The Studio includes a number of mini projects gradually increasing in complexity. Projects will include case study of an Architect of note, a review of the design process for a specific building and a final group project. In the final group project the students will work through the preliminary stages of the design process and develop a design scheme for a small yet complex project. The students will also be required to make oral and visual presentations of the projects.
    Hours: 91
    Credits: 6

    FND1050     Foundation Module (Architecture)
    Description: The Foundation Module is a 4-week preparatory session designed to provide students with the required fundamental skills to be successful within the Architecture-Project and Facility Management degree program. This module will provide the student with their first exposure to Project Based Learning, and serve as preparation for this alternative approach to learning which forms the basis of the program’s structure. This module will also introduce the student to the fundamental principles of teamwork, and the skills necessary to be an effective and productive member of a team. In addition to refreshing their knowledge base in a variety of aspects of the program’s curriculum, students will develop and apply skills in teamwork, graphic communication and verbal presentation through the completion of a program project.
    Hours: 85
    Credits: 6

    LIBS7150     Personal Awareness and Group Dynamics
    Description: Self-awareness, interpersonal communication and team work are essential elements in both work and social settings. An experiential approach ? learning by doing - assists the participant to become an effective individual and group member. Individual and team activities will enhance participants’ skills to work with a variety of personalities in diverse situations.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    MATH1050     Applied Mathematics I
    Description: This course includes variety of algebraic techniques for solving problems in architecture, structure and construction applications. The material covered includes ratio and variation, plane analytic geometry, determinants for solving linear equations, matrices, approximate methods for area calculations, and properties of geometric sections found in the construction industry, probability and statistics, and linear regression.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    Level Two
    ARCH1010     Human Health, Ergonomics, Environment and Safety
    Description: This course examines the interrelated effects and connections of the environment (built and natural), and ergonomics on human health and safety. It examines the design of environments that will enable humans to make the best use of their abilities within a healthy and safe context. It also considers responsibilities for protection of non-human environments and the social and ethical issues associated with the design, construction and management of built environments. The cost/benefit analysis approach to the regulation of environmental pollution, management techniques and principles of design will be examined.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH1130     Construction Materials and Methods II
    Description: This is a study of the more advanced aspects of building construction, dealing with the intrinsic connection between conceptual design and technological aspects of a building's structural materiality: reinforced concrete, precast and prestressed concrete, steel framing systems; building envelop: building science, curtain walls, window walls, glazing and roofing systems; fire protection design and the evolution of an industrialized method of designing and assembling buildings. The course studies materials and methods as applied to renovation projects and building additions. The course includes preservation and enhancement of existing materials and construction assemblies as well as the study of the juxtaposition of new materials and assemblies with those of the existing building. Studies are based on a variety of facets including visual, cost, climate, code and environment.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH1120

    ARCH1150     Code I
    Description: This course provides an introduction to the regulatory, prescriptive and objective based aspects of design and construction. Standards, Codes and Regulations will be explored in relation to their intended purpose. The importance of these documents will be demonstrated through an examination of their historic development. The appropriate application of these documents will be demonstrated through a review of actual projects done in the Studio. Specific design and construction problems will be presented for review and resolution utilizing the appropriate Standards, Codes and/or Regulations.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    COMP1190     Computer Concepts II
    Description: This course will concentrate on the use of the digital software for computer-aided design, detailing and modeling. The intent of the course is to provide the student with a solid foundation of the command structure and capabilities of various computer programs in order to facilitate self-study and advanced application during Studios. Both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional applications will be reviewed.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: COMP1180

    DSGN1010     Building Systems I
    Description: This course introduces the student to the basic systems of a building, with a concentration on HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning), lighting and sound. The standard components of each system will be reviewed and studied, particularly in relation to their performance when configured in common systems types. System design will be reviewed utilizing multi-residential, office and school project types. Using mathematics and scientific principles students will learn and apply heat loss heat gain, fire retardation, lighting application and sound and reverberation principles.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    DSGN1060     Studio II
    Description: This Studio will lead the student through the process of design, problem solving, presentation and building/construction management through the development of an addition to an existing facility. Students will work in teams and develop a comprehensive proposal covering issues related to space planning, code, building systems design, and material use and construction methods. The final product will include detailed plans and elevations, estimates and specifications, and a detailed model of a building component. The studio will act as a consultancy where other courses and faculty will provide comprehensive critique an assessment. The students will be required to maintain a log book and make a formal presentation of the term project to a jury.
    Hours: 120
    Credits: 8
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN1050

    Level Three

    COOP1030     Co-op Work Term I (Architecture)
    Description: This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the student will also have an opportunity to apply technical knowledge from the prior semesters of study to real life situations. These essential employability and technical skills areas will be improved during the work term while the student responsibly performs the duties as defined in the job description, in accordance with course and program outcomes.

    Student development will be evaluated during and at the conclusion of the work experience.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Four

    ARCH1160     Estimating and Specifications I
    Description: This course introduces the principles of estimating together with a study of written specifications. Estimating will be studied using both manual and computer generated models while specifications will be studied in relation to their structure and purpose. The Studio II Project will be utilized to develop a detailed estimate of the original building and specification for the proposed addition.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH3010     Code II
    Description: This course covers Part 3 of the Ontario Building Code including concepts of health and safety. The course is designed to develop an ability of critical review of this part to be applied to the term project leading up to preparation of working documents including specifications. The course also identifies Underwriters Lab of Canada (ULC) studies including flame spread in relation to the building design.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH1150

    BUS2050     Business Economics
    Description: Contemporary architects are widely recognized as principal decision makers who have to decide among alternatives with respect to expected costs and benefits, while taking into account strategic and policy issues affecting their corporations. This course is based on thorough development and understanding of the concept of the time value of money, cash flow analysis, present and future worth analyses, depreciation and financial accounting, effects of inflation, income taxes, dealing with uncertainty and risks, and the benefit-cost analysis.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    DSGN2010     Building Systems II
    Description: This course applies ASHRAE heat loss/gain and HVAC principles to Ontario Building Code Part 3 (non-residential) buildings. Standard engineering procedures are employed to identify and design appropriate layouts. System options available to condition and ventilate office/commercial occupancies (Part 3 OBC) are identified and categorized as to their performance on an economic basis to allow identification of optimum systems. Project based examples are used to prepare drainage and water supply designs (OBC Part 7 plumbing) for large buildings. The principles and policies governing the design and construction of storm drainage systems and site servicing are examined and ancillary mechanical and basic electrical systems are analyzed.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN1010, DSGN1060

    DSGN2030     Structural Systems I
    Description: This course takes a qualitative approach to the selection and design of an appropriate structural system for the given condition. Three primary systems, wood, concrete and steel will be explored. Utilizing "Rules of Thumb", the student will develop an understanding for the various types of structural systems, the components of each system and how those components go together. The students will further validate "Rules of Thumb" with the use of calculations and analysis of different types of loading on wood, concrete and steel.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    DSGN2110     Studio III
    Description: The overarching premise for this studio is to incorporate and investigate the contemporary design requirements for new building projects in terms of: energy use, material and resource consumption, site design, design with climate, urban context and interior environmental qualities.
    The goal is to propose a high performance building that addresses the current standards, issues and considerations that are part of energy use, environmental concerns, healthy and productive interior environments and other issues that need to be addressed by the design, facility management and building disciplines in light of current cultural, technological and environmental precepts.
    The final proposal for the term will of a mid-sized (10,000 to 25,000 square foot, 1,000 to 2,300 square metre), multi-tenant occupancy that will balance the needs of a number of differing occupant requirements and provisions.
    Hours: 120
    Credits: 8
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN1060

    LIBS7040     Science, Technology and Society
    Description: This theme-based course aims to provide an understanding of the historical, social, economic and political context within which scientific and technological advancement takes place. Innovation is a social product, often an expression of current ideology or a response to a social need. Conversely technological and scientific innovation can transform the structure of society, its value system, and institutions. Through a series of lectures and student-centered activities, this course will assess the impact, the benefits, consequences and implications of the inter-relationship between society and science and technology.
    Hours: 39
    Credits: 3

    Level Five
    ARCH2080     Facility Planning and Management I
    Description: This course offers an overview of the principles of facilities management. The following topics will be included: history of the facility management profession, organizational structure, property and project management, strategic and long term planning, maintenance and operations, and the management of support services.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH2090     Project Management I
    Description: This course will provide an introduction to the principles and methodology of Project Management. Utilizing the projects from Studio III and Studio IV, the relationships amongst the various players of a project will be explored, focusing on the role of the Project Manager. In addition, the traditional project management role of guardian of budget and time will be explored in relation to the new, enhanced role of Client Representative. Detailed project schedules will be developed utilizing various methodologies. The appropriateness of the various types of schedules and methods will be explored in relation to project type and size.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    DSGN2020     Building Systems III
    Description: This course covers HVAC, plumbing and water supply systems. The systems are analyzed in the context of OBC Part 11 (renovations). In addition, fire protection systems, including sprinklers, standpipes, and detection/alarm components are examined to illustrate specific application problems in renovation situations. These are addressed in the context of project-based assignments. Fire Code and other applicable regulatory issues are analyzed to formulate effective solutions. The principles underlying acoustic performance of interior spaces are identified, and used in the design process for both new and OBC Part 11 projects. Selection of basic electrical equipment for OBC Part 3 buildings is undertaken with conformance to the Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN2010

    DSGN2040     Structural Systems II
    Description: This course exposes the student to the quantitative aspects of structural design with a review of the methods for calculating loads, internal forces and stresses. The intent is to develop an understanding for the terminology and process of structural design as well as an appreciation for the complex nature of structures. The course will include calculations and analysis of different types of loading on wood, concrete and steel structures.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN2030

    DSGN2120     Studio IV
    Description: This Studio will involve the renovation of an existing facility. Students will work in teams to develop detailed drawings in addition to the variety of strategies required to ensure the needs of each tenant are met. Project schedules will be developed along with move and communication strategies. The final product will include detailed plans and elevations, estimates and specifications, and a model. The studio will act as a consultancy where other courses and faculty will provide comprehensive critique an assessment. The students will be required to maintain a log book and make a formal presentation of the term project to a jury.
    Hours: 120
    Credits: 8
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN2110

          Electives: General Education
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

    Level Six
    COOP2010     Co-op Work Term II (Architecture)
    Description: This course will provide students with college-approved work experience in project and facility management environments. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the student will also have an opportunity to apply technical knowledge from the prior semesters of study to real life situations. These essential employability and technical skills areas will be improved during the work term while the student responsibly performs the duties as defined in the job description, in accordance with course and program outcomes.

    Student development will be evaluated during and at the conclusion of the work experience.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Seven
    ARCH2020     Facility Planning and Management II
    Description: This course covers planning procedures related to complex building and buildings with multiple tenants. It includes studies of facility planning in relation to operations, maintenance, human and environmental factors and real estate. Facility needs are studied in context of the transportation and handling of equipment and supplies, lighting, sewerage, ventilation, water supply and electrical power. Inventory systems are studied in relation to non-fixed assets.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH2080 or ARCH3110

    ARCH3090     Estimating and Specifications II
    Description: This course builds on the previous estimating and specifications course with a focus on term project of building renovation and occupancy change. Estimating is studied using manual and computer generated models while specifications are studied in relation to contract document and law and applied to Part 11 of the Ontario Building Code. Co-occupancy of construction and building process are critically reviewed.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH1160 or ARCH3110

    DSGN3010     Energy and Design
    Description: This course centres on issues surrounding the integration of Sustainable and Passive Design principles, into conceptual and practical architectural design. Topics include: solar geometry, climate/regional limitations, vernacular architecture, natural lighting, and passive design and sustainability initiatives. Case studies will be used extensively as a vehicle to discuss the success/failure of ideas and their physical applications.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH3110 or COMM1650

    DSGN3110     Studio V
    Description: Through this studio the student will explore the issues related to the retro-fit of an existing building to accommodate a new occupancy and identify the various roles of the professional team in the renovation industry. The student will develop a comprehensive proposal for the reuse of an existing facility of approximately 30,000 ft² (3,000 m²). Using Part 11 of the Ontario Building Code and within given parameters, the student will develop two-dimensional and three-dimensional presentation documents. Stages of development of the studio projects will include the development of a feasibility study for the proposal. The final oral and visual presentation will be made to a jury. This course serves to have the student integrate knowledge from previous courses with various aspects of the built environment industry to form a complete building design. Lectures and tutorials support the student’s design work.

    The student will demonstrate awareness of the complex and varied issues associated with the re-habitation and change of use of facilities. The student’s work is to reflect an awareness of the long-term use and sustainability of the facility ? from renovation through to move-in and then the day-to-day operations and maintenance for the occupants. Work will include: investigation of current contextual considerations; validation of documents for the site and building; feasibility studies for alternate uses for the building; assessment of existing building systems and options for their continued use or alternatives; creation of safe, healthy, and productive interior environments; compliance with applicable codes; cost estimates and schedule of work for the proposed change of use and long-term operation. All work must meet current building code requirements.
    Hours: 120
    Credits: 8
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN2120 or DSGN3120

          Electives: General Education

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

          Electives: Program Option - Choice #1

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 45 Hours

    Elective Courses:


    ARCH3120     Development Economics
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH4040     Facility Operations and Maintenance
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    Level Eight
    COOP3010     Co-op Work Term III (Architecture)
    Description: This course will provide students with college-approved work experience in project and facility management environments. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the student will also have an opportunity to apply technical knowledge from the prior semesters of study to real life situations. These essential employability and technical skills areas will be improved during the work term while the student responsibly performs the duties as defined in the job description, in accordance with course and program outcomes.

    Student development will be evaluated during and at the conclusion of the work experience.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Nine

    ARCH3080     Project Management II
    Description: Project Procurement is an integral part of any project. This course covers the cycle of a project as it deals with purchasing of materials, equipment, labour and professional services. It covers contracts and risk allocation, negotiation, transportation and expediting of the items purchased, changes to purchase orders and contract administration. Ethical standards in purchasing, legal requirements and contract law will be covered. It includes a critical review of construction contracts including the management of the client and the professional team and government approval agencies.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH2090 or ARCH3110

    ARCH4070     Human Factors in the Built Environment
    Description: This course presents the human and environmental factors that, in combination, create the ambient conditions that affect people. Emphasis is given to understanding the principles under which these factors operate with an introduction to techniques for measuring the impact of these factors on people, an organization, and the management of facilities.
    Six human and environmental factors are addressed: temperature and relative humidity; air quality (composition, speed, direction); light; sound; spatial layout and ergonomics; aesthetics and psychosocial dynamics. Students will be introduced to diagnostic techniques to determine the separate and combined performance of human factors.

    Concepts from this course are to be applied directly into Studio VI, Corporate Relocation. Specifically, the studio project will require application of making tradeoffs in interior environmental quality for illumination, acoustics, air quality, thermal comfort, spatial layout, ergonomics, aesthetics and psychosocial dynamics.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    DSGN4010     Studio VI
    Description: The Studio VI project involves the relocation of an existing corporation to new premises. The project will be multi-faceted including the development of strategies to gain employee acceptance of the move, the ability to make changes to a project under development and construction in order to better suit a tenant’s needs, lighting and building system design, workstation design, floor plan layouts, move management, and occupancy management. Students will work in teams and produce detailed proposals suitable for review by senior management as well as drawings, specifications and estimates.
    Hours: 120
    Credits: 8
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN3110

    FIN4010     Financial Management
    Description: This course will cover the role of the financial officer as a key member of management. Topics will also include securities valuation, capital market theory, working capital management, and financial statement analysis and projection techniques. There will be study of the management and analysis of cash, accounts receivable, inventory and short intermediate term liabilities and analysis of profitability and risk.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

          Electives: General Education

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

          Electives: Program Option - Choice #2

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 45 Hours

    Elective Courses:

    ARCH3130     Computerized Project Management
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH4030     Utilities Management
    Description:
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN2020

    Level Ten

    COOP3020     Co-op Work Term IV
    Description: This course will provide students with college-approved work experience in project and facility management environments. This course will increase the student’s understanding of real-life employer expectations with regards to attitudinal, practical, and academic skills required to gain employment and enhance self-marketing skills. In addition to these employability skills, the student will also have an opportunity to apply technical knowledge from the prior semesters of study to real life situations. These essential employability and technical skills areas will be improved during the work term while the student responsibly performs the duties as defined in the job description, in accordance with course and program outcomes.

    Student development will be evaluated during and at the conclusion of the work experience. The student’s written communication skills are evaluated after the work experience through the submission of an essay.
    Hours: 420
    Credits: 14

    Level Eleven

    ARCH3100     History of Advanced Structures
    Description: This course provides an overview of the history of architecture and the built environment in the context of technical and cultural influences. It seeks to position major periods and technological discoveries in their time and place, and to develop a critical understanding the implications of these on our environments. Following a review of classical, gothic and renaissance periods, the course inspects the technological developments of the industrial revolution, the advent of the modern movement, and subsequent post-modern reactions. The course will introduce the student to the unique structures of large building types such as stadia, airport terminals, museums, performing arts centres, etc. The development and management of these building types will be studied and analyzed.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    BUS4010     Business Organizations
    Description: This course covers forms of business organizations, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, joint ventures and limited partnerships. Additional topics will include the nature of a corporation, methods of incorporation, corporate constitutions, share capital and corporate securities. Course also includes a comprehensive study of the internal affairs of a corporation, its structure and directors, as well as the external responsibilities of the corporation, liability for acts of its agents, protection of creditors and the public and environmental issues.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    DSGN4020     Studio VII
    Description: The main objective of this course is for the student to work independently, with internal and external advisors, on the development of an individual thesis. This course provides an opportunity for the student to focus their education on an aspect of the program that they are most interested in. The thesis will entail a comprehensive study of a major topic in architecture, project management or facility management as it relates to the built environment. The student will prepare a substantive thesis document that includes both written and graphic material to illustrate and explain the work.
    Hours: 120
    Credits: 8
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN4010

          Electives: General Education

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 36 Hours

          Electives: Program Option - Choice #3
    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 45 Hours

    Elective Courses:
    ARCH4050     Computer Aided Facility Management
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH4100     Construction Project Cost Management
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

          Electives: Program Option - Choice #4

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 45 Hours

    Elective Courses:

    ARCH4060     Advanced Building Performance and Automation
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH4110     Construction Project Scheduling and Planning
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    Level Twelve

    ARCH4020     Urban and Regional Planning
    Description: This course covers theories of urban and regional planning and the planning application process through an active learning approach. Students apply urban planning and community design theories to the application process utilizing current regional and municipal policies. Emphasis is placed on practical interpretation of planning policies and an understanding of the application process under the Planning Act of Ontario. Recent trends, such as smart growth and sustainable communities, are also covered. Upon completion, students have completed a series of draft applications and have demonstrated a thorough knowledge of the planning process and the role of various stakeholders in the application process.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH4080     Applied Environmental Law & Construction Safety
    Description: This course provides an introduction to selected laws concerning environmental protection and construction safety. Key statutes, regulations and policies that relate to environmental management and construction safety in Ontario are examined in the context of industrial/commercial facilities, brownfields and new urban developments.

    The course reviews the relevance of environmental legislation as it relates to issues such as air and waste quality, hazardous waste management, site assessment and cleanup, emergency planning, spills, transportation of dangerous goods, noise, and vibration. Construction safety and liability will be explored in relation to the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act. The course will provide an understanding of the legal framework in Ontario for approvals, enforcement, penalties, liabilities and reporting requirements under selected applicable law. Case studies and guest speakers will be used to demonstrate the application of environmental and construction safety legislation.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

    ARCH4090     Contract Administration
    Description: This course includes all the required topics for typical construction and facility management contracts. Students are required to synthesize and select appropriate contracts and administer them in simulated business settings through case studies integrated with the term project. This course also includes studies of subcontractor contracts, construction, builders’ and mechanics’ liens, inspection of construction contracts, arbitration and mediation, and labor law and union contracts.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH3080

    DSGN4030     Studio VIII
    Description: This capstone studio is intended to encapsulate and demonstrate the abilities of students in their fourth and final year of this Bachelor Degree in Applied Technology. It will entail the development of a major project, following the premise of one of the previous studios in the APFM curriculum. This project will be developed through all the phases of a typical project from pre-design to occupancy. The project type will engage all the lessons learned in the course of study, including co-op, in the APFM program. Students will perform in a team environment of 4 -5 students. Students individually and collectively will provide complete integration and synthesis of their actions and present them in a professional jury setting to external and internal examiners
    Hours: 120
    Credits: 8
    Pre-Requisites: DSGN4020

    LIBS7090     Law & Ethics for Architectural Professional Practice
    Description: The philosophical, historical and social contexts underlying legal responsibilities, ethical decision making processes, and principles of professional liability and the general duties of architectural and engineering professionals towards the society are the key topics studied in this course. The course will also cover the general principles and concepts of tort and contract law and the law of intellectual property.
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

          Electives: Program Option - Choice #5

    Description: Student must complete a minimum of 45 Hours

    Elective Courses:

    ARCH4010     Facility Planning and Management III
    Description:
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3
    Pre-Requisites: ARCH2020

    ARCH4120     Construction Project Risk Management
    Description:
    Hours: 45
    Credits: 3

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